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Should weed be legal?

Opening Argument

It should be. It has never killed anyone. It is not a dangerous substance. 
passedbillMax_Air29aarong
  1. Should weed be legal?

    16 votes
    1. Yes
      68.75%
    2. No
      31.25%
«1

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Status: Open Debate


Arguments

  • I wouldn't say it's not dangerous. Breathing smoke is always bad for your lungs. Not to mention it is a psychoactive chemical. Those anti-weed commercials are funny as hell, but there are certain people who should not become stoners. This is rare in my experience, but still.

    That being said, the prohibition era shows that prohibiting recreational drugs just creates a market for crime. When criminals are the only ones who can provide a product, there is no health or ethical controls, making it even more dangerous. 
    Prohibiting marijuana places many (otherwise) law abiding and well adjusted people into jail which is a life changing activity.This is a gigantic waste of money, as well.

    I think we should regulate pharmacology and clinically treat addiction, instead of criminalizing it, feeding the dangerous underground markets and taking a relatively harmless vice and turning it into a life ruining (or ending) crime by banning it.
    PogueDrCerealGeorge_HorseSilverishGoldNova
  • @Edril Very true. 
  • Weed may have killed many people. It is a dangerous drug and should not be legal unless possibly used for medical purposes. That would be medical marijuana.
    DrCerealEdrilErfisflatPogueGeorge_Horse
  • Weed may have killed many people. It is a dangerous drug and should not be legal unless possibly used for medical purposes. That would be medical marijuana.

    Explain how weed has killed anyone.
    DrCereal
  • If somebody has too much weed, that could kill them. It is extremely dangerous and does is not beneficial unless it’s used for medical reasons.
    DrCerealErfisflat
  • @Max_Air29

    Can you provide some details about a case where someone overdosed on marijuana?

    DrCereal
  • You'd have to smoke a telephone pole sized joint for it to kill you, halfway through it, you'd likely pass out. It is physically impossible to die from marijuana. For those with lung problems or looking for a means to negate the possibility of any lung damage, there are edibles. Cannabis should be as legal or more legal than their harmful, proven killers, counterparts, tobacco and alcohol.
    DrCerealEdrilPogue
    Pseudoscience: noun; a collection of beliefs or practices mistakenly regarded as being based on scientific method.

    Scientific method: noun; a method of procedure that has characterized natural science since the 17th century, consisting in systematic observation, measurement, and experiment, and the formulation, testing, and modification of hypotheses.

    https://www.gofundme.com/mwmvf-is-the-earth-flat
  • I think that it should be legal but restricted. It hasn't killed anyone and it isn't dangerous if you think about it.  Also, it helps a lot of people relieve stress because they just need something to clear their system and weed does that. However, I think it shouldn't be used in public places where there are a lot of people, especially children, who are being exposed to it. I do think it should be legal though. 
  • someone234someone234 153 Pts
    edited December 2017
    Weed does kill people over long use it both damages brain function and lung function. The latter isn't an issue if you eat it instead of smoking. It kills very slowly though, so that's why one overdose doesn't end up with you dead unless the room isn't well ventilated because then it can kill you.

    I have yet to meet one person who doesn't become much less coherent and intelligent from heavy weed use.

    I am against alcohol being legal.
    Erfisflat
    I come to debate, I stay to troll,
    I leave to think, I return to brawl.
  • Legalizing weed would remove the entire black market ecosystem, resulting in economic benefit.  
    I think it needs to be discouraged and employers still need to ensure that their employees are drug free.
    ErfisflatSilverishGoldNova
    Live Long and Prosper
  • That's the last thing we need, having everyone stoned all the time. I agree that we should fight black market crime, but don't agree to legalize.
  • That's the last thing we need, having everyone stoned all the time. I agree that we should fight black market crime, but don't agree to legalize.
    Everyone is already stoned or worse as it is now. I'd rather be around a stoner than a drunk.
    Pseudoscience: noun; a collection of beliefs or practices mistakenly regarded as being based on scientific method.

    Scientific method: noun; a method of procedure that has characterized natural science since the 17th century, consisting in systematic observation, measurement, and experiment, and the formulation, testing, and modification of hypotheses.

    https://www.gofundme.com/mwmvf-is-the-earth-flat
  • No. I would not want to be killed driving on the highway, for a person high on marijuana to come into my lane and cause an accident. I do not think it should be legalized, it should remain in its current use for medical situations. 
    islander507
    "Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God? " ~Epicurus

    "We must question the story logic of having an all-knowing all-powerful God, who creates faulty Humans, and then blames them for his own mistakes." ~Gene Roddenberry


  • @George_Horse, in that case the same can be said about making alcohol illegal.  I dont think that the argument is about making it legal to drive while under influence 
  • @islander507 I do not approve of alcohol either. It too should not be legalized.
    someone234
    "Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God? " ~Epicurus

    "We must question the story logic of having an all-knowing all-powerful God, who creates faulty Humans, and then blames them for his own mistakes." ~Gene Roddenberry


  • @George_Horse, we already had that during prohibition almost 100 years ago.  I don't think we are going back there, as it caused much illegal activity.
  • @islander507 Really? Is that your best argument? With advances in technology, and the police forces, cracking down on alcohol wouldn't be much of a problem. That time from before was the 1920s, compared to a time now, you can get caught with marijuana, if that [beer] were to be illegal, anyone else can get caught with the new illegal beverage.  
    agsrislander507
    "Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God? " ~Epicurus

    "We must question the story logic of having an all-knowing all-powerful God, who creates faulty Humans, and then blames them for his own mistakes." ~Gene Roddenberry


  • @islander507 I do not approve of alcohol either. It too should not be legalized.
    A fellow crusader in the world of drunks.

    I support a limit of alcohol in the blood etc (same with all drugs). If you got above said amount in your blood, you are forced into rehab.
    I come to debate, I stay to troll,
    I leave to think, I return to brawl.
  • @agsr this mentality of defeatism due to the black market being inevitable is scapegoat mentality.

    Crimes will happen if you outlaw things, that is not a reason to not outlaw them.
    agsrislander507
    I come to debate, I stay to troll,
    I leave to think, I return to brawl.
  • @George_Horse, that's a valid point.  Thanks.  
    George_Horse
  • The reality is that drugs can and do have a market, regardless of whether they are legal or not. This is particularly true of marijuana, which has had a very large black market for much of the time that it has been illegal. I fully accept that marijuana, much like cigarettes, can cause a variety of medical problems. I also accept that it's been associated with problems all its own.

    That being said, despite having no interest in trying the stuff, I do think it should be legalized. In the black market, marijuana is unregulated, which means it can be spiked with dangerous materials that make it all the more dangerous to use. It also doesn't help that those black markets are used by drug cartels to line their coffers, particularly as marijuana engenders far more interest in a broad population than most other illegal drugs. Regulation also means getting a decent amount of revenue from taxes, which can bolster local, state and federal governments and help pay for a variety of health issues.

    Beyond that, I do think there's a reasonable point to be made about personal choice and the capacity of individuals to seek out something that makes them feel better. I think treating these people as criminals creates more problems than it solves, turning addictions into criminal issues rather than a health problem, and pushing a lot more people who do fairly petty crimes into an already massively overcrowded prison system.
  • The reality is that drugs can and do have a market, regardless of whether they are legal or not. This is particularly true of marijuana, which has had a very large black market for much of the time that it has been illegal. I fully accept that marijuana, much like cigarettes, can cause a variety of medical problems. I also accept that it's been associated with problems all its own.

    That being said, despite having no interest in trying the stuff, I do think it should be legalized. In the black market, marijuana is unregulated, which means it can be spiked with dangerous materials that make it all the more dangerous to use. It also doesn't help that those black markets are used by drug cartels to line their coffers, particularly as marijuana engenders far more interest in a broad population than most other illegal drugs. Regulation also means getting a decent amount of revenue from taxes, which can bolster local, state and federal governments and help pay for a variety of health issues.

    Beyond that, I do think there's a reasonable point to be made about personal choice and the capacity of individuals to seek out something that makes them feel better. I think treating these people as criminals creates more problems than it solves, turning addictions into criminal issues rather than a health problem, and pushing a lot more people who do fairly petty crimes into an already massively overcrowded prison system.

    Here's a point I saw: " marijuana is unregulated, which means it can be spiked with dangerous materials that make it all the more dangerous to use."

    So even legalized, can this NOT still happen? 

    "Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God? " ~Epicurus

    "We must question the story logic of having an all-knowing all-powerful God, who creates faulty Humans, and then blames them for his own mistakes." ~Gene Roddenberry


  • MindMasterMindMaster 14 Pts
    edited December 2017

    Effects of marijuana :
    Increased heart rate in the short term.
    A chronic cough and frequent respiratory infections
    Mental and cognitive issues, including problems with learning and memory, hallucinations, anxiety, panic attacks, and psychosis, especially in youth.
    A 2012 study indicated people who smoked marijuana before age 17 were 3.5 times more likely to attempt suicide than those who started smoking marijuana later in life.
    Those dependent on marijuana had a higher risk of experiencing major depression and suicidal thoughts and behaviors.
    Subsequent research published in 2014 indicated daily adolescent users were 18 times more likely to become dependent on marijuana, seven times more likely to attempt suicide and eight times more likely to use other illegal drugs in the future.

    Overdoses:
    On June 23,16 people in Houston"s Hermann Park overdosed on K2 and were hospitalized.
    On July 12, 33 people on a single block in Brooklyn, New York, were suspected of overdosing on K2.
    A few weeks after the Brooklyn episode, 20 people in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, were treated for kush overdoses in a two-day period. Kush is unlike heroin, where people overdose and generally die quickly. People on kush wander into traffic, have seizures or strokes not easily traced back to the drug or are left paralyzed and fighting for their lives.
    Emily Bauer, a teenage girl in suburban Houston, suffered five strokes related to her 2013 overdose. Doctors said 70% of her brain tissue was dead and she would never recover. However, as of 2016, she was slowly regaining some functioning.
    One of the newest banned synthetic pot substances, MDMB-CHMICA is thought to be responsible for 42 overdoses and 29 deaths in Europe.

    High while Driving:
    Drugged driving caused more than 28% of deaths in 2010, compared to 16% in 1999.
    Marijuana was the primary drug responsible for this increase, contributing to 12% of 2010 crashes versus 4% in 1999.
    Marijuana was the primary drug responsible for this increase, contributing to 12% of 2010 crashes versus 4% in 1999.
    Most tests look for delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive substance in marijuana, and 11-OH-THC, its active metabolite.
    A combined use of alcohol and marijuana dramatically increases a driver's risk of death.
    A report by the American Automobile Association (AAA) found that the percentage of drivers who were high on pot during fatal accidents in Washington state more than doubled between 2013 and 2014, with 85 deaths involving THC in 2014.
    In 2007, 8.6% of weekend nighttime drivers tested positive for THC versus 12.6% of drivers in 2013 to 2014, a 48% increase.
    Utah officials said the number of fatal car wrecks in the state in which drivers tested positive for marijuana rose from 11 in 2012 to 38 in 2015, an increase from 6% of crashes to 15%. Analysts said the uptick in marijuana-related crashes may be tied to legalization in nearby states. Concurrently, the percentage of drivers in fatal crashes tested for drugs increased from 42% in 2011 to 62% in 2015.
    Legal cannabis linked to 66% rise in traffic deaths in Colorado: Study reveals a surge in fatal motor accidents since the state went green in 2013.
    Overdose stories:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca...
    http://www.foxnews.com...
    It has killed many people.
    ErfisflatGeorge_Horse

  • Here's a point I saw: " marijuana is unregulated, which means it can be spiked with dangerous materials that make it all the more dangerous to use."

    So even legalized, can this NOT still happen? 


    Is that a problem with potato chips, or ketchup, or Honduran cigars?  Is there any consumer product where this is a problem with factory new goods?
    whiteflameErfisflat

  • So even legalized, can this NOT still happen? 

    Is it possible that, in a system where marijuana is legally grown, processed, packaged and distributed under strict FDA regulations that toxins could be spiked in? I suppose so, but it seems far less likely. Even if it does happen, under a legal system, there is recourse - the company will be investigated and shutting down if necessary. Under a system where this is all illegal, users can’t exactly contact the FDA to report dangerous substances in their weed.
    Erfisflat
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