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Should school uniforms be mandatory?
in Education

By PoguePogue 532 Pts
Should school uniforms be mandatory? 

should-used to indicate obligation or duty
mandatory-required by law or rules; compulsory.
school uniform-uniform wore by students primarily for a school or otherwise educational institution. 
  1. Should school uniforms be mandatory?

    14 votes
    1. Ye
      50.00%
    2. Na
      50.00%
I could either have the future pass me or l could create it. 

“We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.” - Benjamin Franklin  So flat Earthers, man-made climate change deniers, and just science deniers.

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  • someone234someone234 615 Pts
    edited March 11
    I say yes.

    I will of course use the classic killer point that rich kids cannot easily taunt and bully poorer kids if all are forced to wear the same 'brand' (outside of sports class).

    There are two more points to consider.

    • In the working world, while uniform itself is in few careers, the partial wearing of clothes (especially clothe-types) that you have to either wear or get fired for not wearing is extremely commonplace and preparing children mentally for wearing things they'd rather not wear is important in preparing them for the 'real world of work'.
    • This is a flip-side of the former point but all the jobs where you're free to wear what you want, rarely ever require good grades at that line of work and therefore school doesn't need to bother preparing you for the freedom, freedom is something you'll naturally crave if you're drawn to freelance and/or work-for-yourself type of work.
    Fascism
  • agsragsr 848 Pts
    I am not a fan of uniforms.  I believe in a dress code, but not a uniform. That's actually more realistic prep for the future, as many professional jobs leave it upto you what you wear within constraints.  Choosing what to wear is actually an important decision how you show up in a real workplace. What you wear to work matters and often impacts perception.  Kids should start to learn about that early.  
    Live Long and Prosper
  • FascismFascism 332 Pts
    I believe in uniforms due to the reasons that @someone234 pointed out, but I think they shouldn't be extremely strict, just like in a usual work place where everyone isn't wearing the same exact thing. 
  • NopeNope 342 Pts
    My school used to have school uniforms every day except on Friday which was a day that you could where anything within a dress code.
  • Good posts, but why do schools enforce school uniforms, and where are they coming from when making such decisions? Schools in Mexico require uniforms whereas most schools in America do not. Sure, you have your school attire, say a band shirt or a university logo, but because we value freedom of expression, maybe that is why schools don't enforce this rule. 
    A good debate is not judged by bias, but in the context of the debate, where objectivity is key and rationale prevalent. 


  • @WilliamSchulz America has much less freedom of expression than a nation like Mexico. That was quite a bad example to bring up.

    In Mexico you can basically type anything you want online as well as do a lot of things from graffiti to saying 'i want to kill politician X, Y or Z' and have no backlash.

    Sure, you can't speak out against local drug lords or Christianity but if you avoid just those two things you have total freedom of expression.
  • @WilliamSchulz America has much less freedom of expression than a nation like Mexico. That was quite a bad example to bring up.

    In Mexico you can basically type anything you want online as well as do a lot of things from graffiti to saying 'i want to kill politician X, Y or Z' and have no backlash.

    Sure, you can't speak out against local drug lords or Christianity but if you avoid just those two things you have total freedom of expression.
    That may be true, but although you have total freedom of expression, that doesn't make it good expression. In Mexico, complete freedom allows a person to write, speak, and act profanely in a way that is not present in the United States. While we have freedom of expression, we control it with certain rules so that it does not get out of control bad. In this way, I say we have more freedom of expression because there is respect, dignity, and genuinity in most works, and those that don't are stopped by the government. After all, we have freedom of speech, but we can not slander another individual.
    A good debate is not judged by bias, but in the context of the debate, where objectivity is key and rationale prevalent. 


  • @WilliamSchulz America has much less freedom of expression than a nation like Mexico. That was quite a bad example to bring up.

    In Mexico you can basically type anything you want online as well as do a lot of things from graffiti to saying 'i want to kill politician X, Y or Z' and have no backlash.

    Sure, you can't speak out against local drug lords or Christianity but if you avoid just those two things you have total freedom of expression.
    That may be true, but although you have total freedom of expression, that doesn't make it good expression. In Mexico, complete freedom allows a person to write, speak, and act profanely in a way that is not present in the United States. While we have freedom of expression, we control it with certain rules so that it does not get out of control bad. In this way, I say we have more freedom of expression because there is respect, dignity, and genuinity in most works, and those that don't are stopped by the government. After all, we have freedom of speech, but we can not slander another individual.
    So, from the perspective of an actual mexican here: 

    @WilliamSchulz ; We do not have 'complete' freedom as you say, we also cannot slander other individuals, people can actually sue someone for slandering or defamation. The fact that people never actually do it, because there is a lot of corruption and people don't usually have enough money to hire a lawyer for such things, is another issue. Also, the fact that there are works that are respectful, dignified and genuine is not just something that exists in the US, just because you think that mexicans are disrespectful, undignified and not genuine, doesn't mean that it's a fact. In every single country in the world there are people with these positive qualities, while at the same time there are people with the opposite qualities. So please let's not attribute such qualities to a whole population or country just because of your personal impressions.

    @someone234 we can totally speak out against drug lords and Christianity, you just have to prepared to face the consequences if you choose to do so. And people who write stuff saying "I want to kill politician X, Y or Z" don't get backlash because, let's just say that the police force or government systems are not as tight here as they are in the US, or are not as efficient. 

    Now, schools in Mexico have the choice to ask their students to wear a uniform or not to. For example in my school, like I mentioned before, there were somedays of the week that we didn't have to use our uniform. The rule was that we had to attend school wearing our uniform on mondays for the flag ceremonies and on days we had P.E which could vary between 2 or three times a week. The other days we were free to bring clothes that were within the school's regulations, meaning no ripped jeans, no short short, short or mini skirt, cleavage (for women/girls), also no piercings, visible tattoos, etc.  

    Most public schools requiere uniforms, while private schools can choose between uniforms or no uniforms. 
    Fascismsomeone234
  • FascismFascism 332 Pts
    @MajoMILSdlGMGV Lol. That's more freedom of speech than in the US as of now. I'm not talking in context of the law, but in context of how the society reacts. 
    MajoMILSdlGMGV
  • @Fascism Well, yeah I agree. The United States is in a tough situation at the moment and I truly hope that it improves.
  • @WilliamSchulz America has much less freedom of expression than a nation like Mexico. That was quite a bad example to bring up.

    In Mexico you can basically type anything you want online as well as do a lot of things from graffiti to saying 'i want to kill politician X, Y or Z' and have no backlash.

    Sure, you can't speak out against local drug lords or Christianity but if you avoid just those two things you have total freedom of expression.
    That may be true, but although you have total freedom of expression, that doesn't make it good expression. In Mexico, complete freedom allows a person to write, speak, and act profanely in a way that is not present in the United States. While we have freedom of expression, we control it with certain rules so that it does not get out of control bad. In this way, I say we have more freedom of expression because there is respect, dignity, and genuinity in most works, and those that don't are stopped by the government. After all, we have freedom of speech, but we can not slander another individual.
    So, from the perspective of an actual mexican here: 

    @WilliamSchulz ; We do not have 'complete' freedom as you say, we also cannot slander other individuals, people can actually sue someone for slandering or defamation. The fact that people never actually do it, because there is a lot of corruption and people don't usually have enough money to hire a lawyer for such things, is another issue. Also, the fact that there are works that are respectful, dignified and genuine is not just something that exists in the US, just because you think that mexicans are disrespectful, undignified and not genuine, doesn't mean that it's a fact. In every single country in the world there are people with these positive qualities, while at the same time there are people with the opposite qualities. So please let's not attribute such qualities to a whole population or country just because of your personal impressions.

    @someone234 we can totally speak out against drug lords and Christianity, you just have to prepared to face the consequences if you choose to do so. And people who write stuff saying "I want to kill politician X, Y or Z" don't get backlash because, let's just say that the police force or government systems are not as tight here as they are in the US, or are not as efficient. 

    Now, schools in Mexico have the choice to ask their students to wear a uniform or not to. For example in my school, like I mentioned before, there were somedays of the week that we didn't have to use our uniform. The rule was that we had to attend school wearing our uniform on mondays for the flag ceremonies and on days we had P.E which could vary between 2 or three times a week. The other days we were free to bring clothes that were within the school's regulations, meaning no ripped jeans, no short short, short or mini skirt, cleavage (for women/girls), also no piercings, visible tattoos, etc.  

    Most public schools requiere uniforms, while private schools can choose between uniforms or no uniforms. 
    I am not calling Mexicans ungeniune or undignified, I was simply stating that because of the presence and the power held by the drug lords and other terrorist groups, that Mexico's speech among citizens is silenced and unheard compared to the people in power. In that way, the US has more freedom of speech because our government has power over these types of groups thus giving us more opportunities for our voice to be heard. There are certain rules that restrict the speech, but that is to make sure that Mexico's situation does not carry over here. 
    someone234
    A good debate is not judged by bias, but in the context of the debate, where objectivity is key and rationale prevalent. 


  • I think, in contrary, that it would be better if schools conducted weekly "best costume" contests, where kids would be allowed to wear anything they want, and the costume that gets the best vote wins. Schools should promote individuality and self-reliance, not conformism and obedience.

    This is one of the biggest current problems with the mandatory education: it puts people through a compression machine, destroying individuality by regularly forcing them to do something they do not want to do. This is one of the main reasons so many people by the end of high school give up on their teenage dreams and resort to some boring office work for the rest of their lives: schools have this property of beating any originality out of people, forcing them to play by the mainstream rules.

    You can see it a lot in Japan, where schools are very strict and not only is the uniform mandatory, but they even have overall appearance requirements (girls with long hair are not allowed into schools in some provinces, for example). As a result, many adults there have dead eyes, they look like they lost all passion to life, and they just go through the same boring routine every day until their retirement.

    So no, in my opinion not only should school uniforms not be mandatory, but even private schools that introduce uniforms by their own initiative should be pressured by the parents and kids to revert the decision.
  • Yes. This would resolve class warfare in schools.


  • I'm all in on support for school uniforms. I also prefer strict ones, however if they are in the public school system the clothes need to be free or very cheap. I went to Catholic schools growing up so I had the choice of 3 different color pants or shorts, 3 different colored polos, or an Oxford shirt with tie. Sure it was uncomfortable a lot, but I found freedom in having no choice what to wear. I didn't have to plan any outfits, I didn't have to keep up with styles, I didn't have to worry about how others will react to my clothing choices. It absolutely helps level the playing field between the classes. All in all I was a huge fan.
  • CheesusFarleyCheesusFarley 27 Pts
    edited August 5
    Teenager going into 8th grade here. Are you people in the comments suggesting that this should be obligatory in private schools, charter schools, and public schools, or only public schools? If all three, why the hell should private and charter schools, with their own notions be forced to have uniforms? The United States doesn't require laws as dumb as that. Laws are supposed to prevent people from physical harm, economical harm, and very few cases of emotional harm. I might be forgetting a few minuscule things, but definitely not this kind of emotional harm. Sure, we should have laws that outlaw saying things like, "I know where you live, I'm going to kill you", but this is ridiculous.
  • CheesusFarleyCheesusFarley 27 Pts
    edited August 5
    ignore this comment
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