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Should the United Kingdom legalize cannabis for medical and recreational use?
in Politics

By JackNewtonJackNewton 38 Pts edited December 1
should the united kingdom legalize cannabis?

I think so, here's why:
The UK would benefit from the legalization of medical and recreational cannabis would result in savings from police budget of around £200 million.
could save the taxpayer £900 million in a year.
the national health service would make back £100 million by not prescribing sleeping pills, pain relief and antidepressants.
if the government taxed the sale of recreational cannabis they would make approximately £3.5billion.

I think yes for both recreational and medical use, you're welcome to change my mind.

piloteer
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Arguments

  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    The medical weed angle in the legalization of weed conversation, is a ploy.

    When weed is legalized for medical use, the pro recreational weed crowd supporters/ users are going to call for the legalization of recreational weed to accompany the medical weed soon after.






  • Yes. Medical patients have the right to pursue whatever medical treatments they need.
    piloteerApplesauce
  • @TTKDB

    What exactly is the problem with legalization of marijuana? It's legal in the state I live in, were just fine!
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer

    Is it fair to a kid, if an adult smokes weed in the presence of the kid?

    Before and after the legalization of recreational weed took place? 



  • @TTKDB

    As long as the kid doesn't get high, it's no different than having a glass of wine in front of a kid.
    JackNewton
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer

    What gives a parent the right to use illegal drugs like weed around their kids whether it's illegal or legal to do so? 

    How do you view the above situation as? Is it pro drug user or  anti kid? 

    What gives a parent the right to enable a kid with alcohol in the states where enabling a kid with his illegal to do so? 

    How do you view the above situation as? Is it pro alcohol abuser, or anti kid? 

    And before weed was legal there are videos showing parents, teaching and coaching kids on how to smoke weed?

    What gives a weed user the right to teach or coach a kid in how to use weed? 




  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    Correction: 

    What gives a parent the right to enable a kid with alcohol in the states where enabling a kid with is illegal to do so? 
  • @TTKDB

    You asked me"what gives a parent the right to smoke weed around their kids whether it's legal or illegal to do so?"

    If it's legal, than that constitutes as a right. So the law is what gives people the right. This debate isn't about whether kids should be smoking weed, it's about whether the UK should legalize weed. I don't know of any state where it's illegal for a parent to drink in front of their kids. As long as they're not being violent, or operating machinery, or giving any alcohol to the kids. If marijuana is legal, than the same guidelines apply. If your question was on a moral basis as opposed to a legal one, than that's a pretty redundant question. I could just as easily ask, on what moral grounds do parents NOT have the right to smoke weed or drink alcohol around their children. As far as any social feelings toward those issues, that doesn't matter to me in the least. I don't base any of my decisions on whatever social construct you can throw at me. The law is all that matters to me.

    Let's talk about how redundant your argument is, shall we? What right do parents have to keep silverware in their house and use it around their children? Silverware is WAY more dangerous than weed. Weed never killed anybody, but a fork certainly can. If you were really intent, I'm sure even a butter knife could get the job done. Obviously, the question I asked you at the top of this paragraph is asinine, what makes you think your question is not?
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer

    "If it's legal, than that constitutes as a right. So the law is what gives people the right."

    But if it's against the law for the kids to be around weed, yet there are some parents who smoke weed around family, then wouldn't that be breaking the law making recreational by using it around kids when it's illegal for the kids to have weed or to be exposed to it? 

    I can see if a child is utilizing MEDICAL weed to address a health issue, but using recreational weed around the kids, couldn't that maybe looked at as an under the table double standard? 

    Basically pitting medical weed use against recreational weed use? 

    And placing the legalization of weed in general in the middle of a contraction of the terms situation,  based on the law making weed for both medicinal use and recreational use legal? 

    "Let's talk about how redundant your argument is, shall we? What right do parents have to keep silverware in their house and use it around their children? Silverware is WAY more dangerous than weed. Weed never killed anybody, but a fork certainly can."

    Where is your legitimate evidence supporting your individual claim that silverware is more dangerous than weed is? 

    From a Nationwide news media outlet source?

    ABC, NBC, CBS, NPR, PBS, MSNBC, CNN, or maybe even FOX news? 

    Or maybe Time or National Geographic magazine's? 

    Or USA today, a maybe a magazine or newspaper from the UK itself? 

    That can cooberate your claim? 


  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer

    "Let's talk about how redundant your argument is, shall we? What right do parents have to keep silverware in their house and use it around their children? Silverware is WAY more dangerous than weed. Weed never killed anybody, but a fork certainly can." 

    What's more dangerous?

    Kitchen utensils or a human being wielding a kitchen utensil, in a life threatening manner?

    A vehicle parked in a parking spot, or a human being abusing alcohol, and then illegally driving their vehicle and causing an accident, that with a likely probability, that  harms innocent people and maybe harming the drunk driver themselves? 

    Weed, or an adult, driving drugged up on weed, regardless of the country, and the drugged driver, causes an accident to occur, and innocent people are hurt because of the drugged driver's drugged driving actions? 

    Weed, or the adult, or the underaged weed smoker using recreational weed around kids, or the underaged weed user, using weed around the underaged individuals? 

    Just because something is legalized, doesn't mean that it won't likely be used and abused (post legalization,) by various individual drug users, just as it was used and abused, by various individual drug users when something was previously illegal.

    Individual human beings in general, are more dangerous than a kitchen utensil, a parked vehicle, and any container holding alcohol, or a container, containing a prescription drug, or previously illegal drug, that's been legalized. 
  • @TTKDB

    So what your saying is kitchen utensils should be banned because any human could potentially misuse them?!?! Oh my gosh, don't you understand that right now, you and I are representatives of the US population, and now this person from the UK is going to think that this is our method of how we attempt reasoning? That is gross. Marijuana has been legal in my state for 2 years, and the number of people who have caused a deadly car accident because they were high on weed is approaching ZERO. You're seriously misrepresenting marijuana! The number of overdoses caused by weed is also zero. I have absolutely no comprehension on why you assume that people who are high on weed are going to lose all concept of reality and horribly maim all the neighborhood cats with kitchen utensils. Using subjective reasoning on issues like this are invalid arguments, all we know about your point of view right now is that you think people who are high on weed are potentially dangerous with potato pealers. 

    If marijuana is legal, then no, it's not illegal to smoke it in the presence of your family. It is not a crime for children to be around marijuana in my state, just like it's not a crime for children to be around alcohol. If you're so close to your children that they could potentially get high,(even though it doesn't actually work that way)then obviously your not being responsible, but it doesn't constitute as abuse if you smoke marijuana in full view of your children. If your children could get a hold of your alcohol and drink it, then you're not being a responsible adult, but that doesn't mean alcohol or marijuana should be banned. It's not illegal to sit with a couple of friends around the tv and enjoy a couple of beers while watching a football game, or a glass of wine while discussing your favorite shows to bing on. For our UK friends, let me be clear that when I say football, I don't mean soccer. 
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer

    "So what your saying is kitchen utensils should be banned because any human could potentially misuse them?!?!"

    No.

    "Oh my gosh, don't you understand that right now, you and I are representatives of the US population, and now this person from the UK is going to think that this is our method of how we attempt reasoning? That is gross. Marijuana has been legal in my state for 2 years, and the number of people who have caused a deadly car accident because they were high on weed is approaching ZERO."

    Some research to indulge in:

    https://www-pewtrusts-org.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/blogs/stateline/2018/05/31/drugged-driving-deaths-spike-with-spread-of-legal-marijuana-opioid-abuse?


    https://www-usnews-com.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/www.usnews.com/news/health-care-news/articles/2018-05-31/more-drivers-killed-under-the-influence-of-drugs-than-alcohol?


    "If marijuana is legal, then no, it's not illegal to smoke it in the presence of your family. It is not a crime for children to be around marijuana in my state, just like it's not a crime for children to be around alcohol. If you're so close to your children that they could potentially get high,(even though it doesn't actually work that way)then obviously your not being responsible, but it doesn't constitute as abuse if you smoke marijuana in full view of your children."

    Have you seen a (study's, polls, or surveys,) that have been conducted asking some of the kids who possibly have had illegal recreational weed and legalized recreational weed smoked around them, say since 2012?

    And asked them how they felt about the adults using the recreational weed around them in their presence?

    Maybe some of the those kids could have allergies to the weed, or if their brain development could have been affected by the weed by the adults or the underaged weed users around them? 

    The answer to the above questions are this, when it comes to certain  types of recreational weed use and those negatively affected by the weed users weed use, the right / or the more enlightening questions, for the rest of society to be fairly and equally educated on (both sides of the pros and cons conversations of weed legalization) questions won't get asked when there are individuals trying to get weed legalized in this or that state, because the pro legalization of recreational weed, I'm guessing need the narratives of weed legalization to be pretty much maintained in a positive spotlight, right? 

    (Along with these other talking points: Taxation and revenue.)

    "You're seriously misrepresenting marijuana! The number of overdoses caused by weed is also zero."

    What kinds of other drugs could be mixed with weed? 

    Haven't there been conversations along those lines?

    Aren't there individuals who are cross breeding this and that strain of weed, to see how potent they can make the next hybrid strain of weed? 

    Say past the current THC level of 33%? 

    Maybe the overall fair and equal conversations in regards to recreational weed have maybe been misrepresented? 




  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer

    Correction: 

    "From pewtrusts.org"

    "Drugged Driving Deaths Spike With Spread of Legal Marijuana, Opioid Abuse"


    "From USNews.com"

    "More Drivers Killed Under the Influence of Drugs Than Alcohol"

  • @TTKDB

    Your links are not doing anything
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer

    What about these points of view?

    Have you seen a (study's, polls, or surveys,) that have been conducted asking some of the kids who possibly have had illegal recreational weed and legalized recreational weed smoked around them, say since 2012?

    And asked them how they felt about the adults using the recreational weed around them in their presence?

    Maybe some of the those kids could have allergies to the weed, or if their brain development could have been affected by the weed by the adults or the underaged weed users around them? 

    The answer to the above questions are this, when it comes to certain  types of recreational weed use and those negatively affected by the weed users weed use, the right / or the more enlightening questions, for the rest of society to be fairly and equally educated on (both sides of the pros and cons conversations of weed legalization) questions won't get asked when there are individuals trying to get weed legalized in this or that state, because the pro legalization of recreational weed, I'm guessing need the narratives of weed legalization to be pretty much maintained in a positive spotlight, right? 

    (Along with these other talking points: Taxation and revenue.)

    "You're seriously misrepresenting marijuana! The number of overdoses caused by weed is also zero."

    What kinds of other drugs could be mixed with weed? 

    Haven't there been conversations along those lines?

    Aren't there individuals who are cross breeding this and that strain of weed, to see how potent they can make the next hybrid strain of weed? 

    Say past the current THC level of 33%? 

    Maybe the overall fair and equal conversations in regards to recreational weed have maybe been misrepresented?  
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
  • piloteerpiloteer 105 Pts
    edited December 5
    @TTKDB

    You've cited a study that plainly says, "there is no definitive data linking drugged driving to crashes.". It also states, "With marijuana, metabolites can stay in the body for weeks, long after impairment has ended, making it difficult to determine when the person used the drug." In the words of a director for the highway safety group, “We don’t have as clear a method for every officer to conduct roadside tests.” At least the study is honest because the people who conducted it wilfully admit that the statistics on marijuana impairment are not reliable because marijuana can stay in the bloodstream for a month after the initial use. When someone is found to have marijuana in their system, there is no reliable tests that can definitely tell whether the person was high at the time of the test, or if the marijuana had been in their system for weeks already. If someone dies in a car crash and is tested for drugs, and marijuana is found their system, your study plainly says that it can't necessarily be considered the reason for the crash, because the marijuana may have been in their system for weeks before. There are no reliable studies on how many fatal car crashes have been caused by marijuana impairment. https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/full/10.2105/AJPH.2017.303848. This study has found that drugged driving fatalities DID NOT rise in states where marijuana was legalized. In fairness, this study also claims that statistics on marijuana impairment are not reliable and further studies were needed. 

    Obviously were getting away from the real point of this discussion. If you drive while you're impaired, you're breaking the law. Nobody on this thread is arguing that we should be allowed to drive while were high. Just as nobody should be allowed to drive while drunk, or while there taking sleeping pills. If you use marijuana in your home or at a bar, you're not allowed to drive, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't be able to use marijuana at all. Marijuana is not physically addicting. There is no recorded case of a marijuana overdose. Although marijuana does impair your judgement, studies have shown it to be far less dangerous than alcohol which is known to dangerously impair your judgement even in small doses.

    We are now just starting to realize the true medical benefits that marijuana can offer. The reason this is just happening now is because of the stigma that came with marijuana use and the medical communities opposition to study it. Now that marijuana has become socially acceptable, the medical community has embraced it as a viable medicinal compound with many useful benefits. TTKDB's views on marijuana are outdated. Not to say that it's not a viable opinion, but that's all it is, an opinion. TTKDB offers no reliable statistics on why marijuana should not be considered a useful medical drug. All we have so far is an unreliable study on car crashes. Another thing TTKDB is trying to bring up is whether or not marijuana use in front of children should be considered taboo, but all that can be offered here is someone's opinion, not objective facts. The tide has turned, society has accepted marijuana as a recreational drug and a medical drug, people who disagree with this can only have their opinions which will do nothing to stem the tide, especially as more and more medical benefits are realized. 

    I'm not a citizen of the UK, and I usually have no opinion on the policies of other countries, but since I do live in a state where marijuana is legal for medical and recreational use, I can tell other people what the ramifications of legalizing marijuana has been. I can say with certainty that marijuana is not tearing the fragile fabric of our communities. We are not in the midst of a breakdown of social order here. We're doing just fine!
    JackNewton
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer

    Are you a weed smoker piloteer? 


    JackNewton
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer

    "I'm not a citizen of the UK, and I usually have no opinion on the policies of other countries, but since I do live in a state where marijuana is legal for medical and recreational use, I can tell other people what the ramifications of legalizing marijuana has been. I can say with certainty that marijuana is not tearing the fragile fabric of our communities. We are not in the midst of a breakdown of social order here. We're doing just fine!"

    Who is "we?"

    So when a parent is teaching or coaching a kid on how to utilize and smoke weed, how do you maybe view that moral fabric? 

    Or when a weed using teenager, is teaching or coaching another teenager for the first time in how to use weed, how might you view that moral fabric? 

    There is a website called "Parents Opposed to Pot" 

    http://www.poppot.org/

    How might you view the moral fabric of their website?

    Why not reach out to them, and maybe ask them their thoughts on how recreational weed use affects individuals from their perspectives? 

    This is one of the articles from their website: 

    "STONED PARENTS FROM A CHILD’S PERSPECTIVE

    Growing up around marijuana smoke was not easy"


    "We are now just starting to realize the true medical benefits that marijuana can offer. The reason this is just happening now is because of the stigma that came with marijuana use and the medical communities opposition to study it. Now that marijuana has become socially acceptable, the medical community has embraced it as a viable medicinal compound with many useful benefits."

    You mean that some of the pro weed crowd and some of the recreational weed users, using the heck out of the term (Medical Weed) to help get weed legalized for medicinal use first right?) 

    And then used the (medical weed legalization angle) as fodder to "help promote" the second part of the legalization of weed idea to the rest of society, the (recreational weed legalization notion) right?

    Do you have any counter commentary for the below? 

    "You're seriously misrepresenting marijuana! The number of overdoses caused by weed is also zero."

    What kinds of other drugs could be mixed with weed? 

    Haven't there been conversations along those lines?

    Aren't there individuals who are cross breeding this and that strain of weed, to see how potent they can make the next hybrid strain of weed? 

    Say past the current THC level of 33%? 

    Maybe the overall fair and equal conversations in regards to recreational weed have maybe been misrepresented?  
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    The legalization of anything once illegal still gets misused and abused.

    Whether an individual is at home indulging in alcohol or recreational marijuana, or is driving illegally under the influence of either alcohol or recreational weed.

    Do the sober drivers who sometimes have family in their vehicles with them, get a say, when a drugged driver or a drunk driver pushes their illegal practice of driving under influence of either weed or alcohol, and causes an accident that harms the sober driver and or the other family members who are in the same vehicle?

    When do the innocent people harmed by the drunk or drugged drivers, get a say?

    After an accident is caused by the drunk or drugged driver, that's when they get their say? 

    Why can't the laws making drunk and drugged driving illegal to begin with, be enough of a voice for the drunk and drugged drivers be enough to make the drunk and drugged drivers, to take heed in and respect the innocent people on the same roadways with them, as the drunk and drugged drivers abuse that simple law, and go about hurting others because the drunk and drugged driver, maybe viewed their illegal driving practices as no big deal to the drunk or drugged driver? 

    Because, isn't it a big deal to the families who have lost family members to the drunk drivers for the past 80 plus years? 

    Now the addition of the the drugged driver, has slowly begun to make their presence to the roadways be known through their individual drugged driving actions.

    Do some of the families and or the kids maybe get a voice and a say, as to how they feel about the recreational weed users weed use being done in their presence? 

    Because the legalization of both alcohol and recreational weed, seem in a way or sense, to have given a voice to the alcohol user, and the recreational weed user?

    I don't know what website's in the United Kingdom might exist for alcohol or recreational weed abuse.

    In the United States; 
    "Mother's Against Drunk Driving" is a source.

    "Mother's Against Drugged Driving" is another source.

    And "Parents Opposed to Pot" is another source.

    And "Citizens Against Legalizing Marijuana" or CALM for short.

    https://calmca.org/
  • @TTKDB when do the drunk and drugged drivers get a say? They are just having fun and getting home so they can work their job.
  • My grandfather was a chronic alcoholic, and he died to alcoholism. My dad used to drink a lot as well, and my parents let me try beer for fun when I was 4. As a result, I did not drink any alcohol aside from occasional sip once a year until I was 26, and I definitely never did anything with a potential for damage when tipsy.

    People who think that kids just automatically repeat everything under their parents, and that the parents smoking marijuana will lead to the kids being addicted to marijuana - probably have never had kids of their own, and forgotten what it was like when they were the kids. In practice, kids tend to be very rebellious, and they are more likely to do the opposite to what their parents do, than the same.

    I personally have never tried marijuana and never will, because the idea of smoking, anything, cigarettes, marijuana or otherwise, utterly disgusts me. However, I see no reason to force my views on others, and I see no harm in someone smoking peacefully. Illegal marijuana should be a thing of the past.
    piloteerJackNewton
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @WordsMatter

    "when do the drunk and drugged drivers get a say? They are just having fun and getting home so they can work their job."

    Why don't you call up the below organizations and tell them what you just stated to me? 

    1.6 million innocent people have been killed by the drunk drivers, I'm guessing that some of those arrested and jailed offenders, had plenty to say to the families in the various court rooms, as they were sentenced to jail because:
    "they were just having fun and getting home so they can work their job." 

    "Mother's Against Drunk Driving" is a source.

    "Mother's Against Drugged Driving" is another source.

    And "Parents Opposed to Pot" is another source.

    And "Citizens Against Legalizing Marijuana" or CALM for short.

    https://calmca.org/




  • @TTKDB

    Your math does not add up, my friend.

    https://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/impaired_driving/impaired-drv_factsheet.html 

    Every day, 29 people in the United States die in motor vehicle crashes that involve an alcohol-impaired driver...
    ...
    In 2016, 10,497 people died in alcohol-impaired driving crashes, accounting for 28% of all traffic-related deaths in the United States.

    Even if we assume that in all such accidents it is the non-drunk people that die, while the drunk drivers magically always walk away alive - we still get just a bit over 10,000 "killings" by drunk drivers a year. To amount for a total of 1.6 million killings, this must have been happening for, at least, 1525 years. As far as I know, however, 1525 years ago on the US territory, there were no drunk drivers.

    The statistic I linked is official, by the way. I do not know where your sources get their statistics - most likely it is, as usual, overblown sensationalist claims from people who suffered from drunk drivers and decided to go for a crusade against all kinds of substance use.

    So, 29 people in the US every day die as a result of drunk driving. And over a hundred million do NOT die. Does not seem like an epidemic to me.
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @MayCaesar

    "My grandfather was a chronic alcoholic, and he died to alcoholism. My dad used to drink a lot as well, and my parents let me try beer for fun when I was 4. As a result, I did not drink any alcohol aside from occasional sip once a year until I was 26, and I definitely never did anything with a potential for damage when tipsy."

    When a kid is enabled with alcohol at a young age, they are found to be 6 times more likely, to become alcoholics in comparison to the other kids who weren't giving alcohol at a young age. 

    "People who think that kids just automatically repeat everything under their parents, and that the parents smoking marijuana will lead to the kids being addicted to marijuana - probably have never had kids of their own, and forgotten what it was like when they were the kids. In practice, kids tend to be very rebellious, and they are more likely to do the opposite to what their parents do, than the same.,"

    I've seen teenagers walking down the side of a street smoking a swisher sweet cigar that had weed in it, it's illegal for these teenagers to have the weed, but when drug smoking teenagers want to carry on like the adults that they weren't, they looked as rebellious as the drug using adults, who have been seen on TV complaining to the police about the alleged weed that was found on their person, or in a backpack, or in the vehicle that they were in as a passenger, or driving and the weed was being held, or belonged to someone else? 

    Along with seeing on 3 separate occasions where teenagers are doing like some of the drunk drivers have done, but in their occurances, a kid borrowed a car with a handicap sign hanging from the rear view mirror, and was smoking weed while driving down the road, a little ways in front of me.

    I wonder if their family member, minded the drug using teenager borrowing their car, and bringing it back smelling like weed smokers ashtray? 

    Another teenager, drove into a gas station parking lot, his car had smoke billowing out of the cracked windows making his car, appear as if was on fire inside of the vehicle.

    When this teenager, showed up, to the store, the customer's cleared out, from not wanting to be in the same place with this drug using teenager? 

    As soon as this guy left the store, the customers went back in the store.

    I guess some, when they go to a store, can have a reputation, that precedes them? 

    On two other occasions, two teenage girls, were getting high on weed, while waiting on a stop light.

    It makes the sober drivers who aren't drunk off of alcohol, or high on weed, why those alcohol abuser's, and drug abuser's are driving around illegally while under the influence? 

    "I personally have never tried marijuana and never will, because the idea of smoking, anything, cigarettes, marijuana or otherwise, utterly disgusts me. However, I see no reason to force my views on others, and I see no harm in someone smoking peacefully. Illegal marijuana should be a thing of the past."

    When drugged drivers hurt, maim or do worse to the other innocent people who are on the same roadways with them, what gives them the right to (force or push) their law breaking ways on others? 

    Innocent people being killed by the drunk drivers, should never have become an issue to begin with, thus making it a (thing of the past) to begin with.

    And the same thing with the drug users, who have already breaking the drugged drivers laws, and changing a victims or a families lives forever. 






  • WordsMatterWordsMatter 221 Pts
    edited December 5
    @TTKDB ok just got back from calling them, they said your crazy and they agree with me.

    Also hilarious that you just completely ignored the fact that @MayCaesar showed that your sources statistics are Bs and instead you went on to make some other nonsense post
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @WordsMatter

     "ok just got back from calling them, they said your crazy and they agree with me."

    Sure you didn't, you're hiding behind this forum, while  people have been hurt and worse, by both the drugged drivers and drunk drivers.

    And your keyboard usage, shows me how you view those websites apparently with the same respect, that the drunk drivers and the drugged drivers have shown to the innocent people's lives that they by breaking laws, and changing the lives of their victims and the victims families forever? 

    Does the rest of society who aren't recreational weed users, do they matter to you, yes or no? 
  • WordsMatterWordsMatter 221 Pts
    edited December 5
    @TTKDB if you don't believe I called them you should call them yourself and ask if a wordsmatter rang them up. They will support me. No everyone should be forced to use weed and put to death if they don't.

    Did you maybe provide misleading statistics? Yes or no? ;)
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @WordsMatter

    @MayCaesar


    And "Citizens Against Legalizing Marijuana" or CALM for short.

    https://calmca.org/

    Citizens Against Legalizing Marijuana (CALM) takes the position that Federal laws against the use, cultivation, and transportation of marijuana should be maintained and enforced and should not be relaxed or softened. Cultivation, processing, transportation and use are illegal under the Federal Controlled Substances Act.

    Marijuana continues to be identified by Congress and the DEA as a schedule I drug. Schedule I drugs are classified as having a high potential for abuse, no currently accepted medical use in treatment, and a lack of accepted safety for use. After decades of study the FDA continues to reaffirm that there is no medical benefit provided by the use of smoked marijuana and that, in fact, considerable harm can be caused by such use. 

    CALM is opposed to any State law that attempts to undermine the Federal Controlled Substances Act. Our position is that California Proposition 215 was misrepresented under the misguided claim that there is substantial “medical” benefit from ingesting marijuana and that the harm and negative impacts would be negligible. Subsequently, SB 420 was enacted in a failed attempt to clarify some aspects of Prop 215.

    We affirm the 2006 FDA finding and vast scientific evidence that marijuana causes harm. The normalization, expanded use, and increased availability of marijuana in our communities are detrimental to our youth, to public health, and to the safety of our society.

    Citizens Against Legalizing Marijuana calls upon the state legislature, county governments, and local municipalities to work within current federal law and to join with federal agencies to stop the spread of marijuana distribution and use. We encourage all citizens to join in this effort.

    “Legalization of marijuana will come at the expense of our children and public safety”
    — Drug Enforcement Administration 2006 

  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @WordsMatter

    @MayCaesar

    The below website and the statistics speak for themselves.

    https://www.madd.org/statistics/

    Almost half of all drivers who were killed in crashes and tested positive for drugs also had alcohol in their system.

    Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol and Illicit Drugs. 2014. https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/report_2688/ShortReport-2688.html

    Alcohol levels above the legal limit were found in 21% of such drivers.

    (NHTSA, 2010)

    57% of fatally injured drivers had alcohol and/or other drugs in their system – 17% had both.

    (NHTSA, 2010)

    Drunk driving involvement in fatal crashes in 2014 was almost four times higher at night than during the day (34 versus 9 percent).

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Traffic Safety Facts 2014: Alcohol-Impaired Driving.” Washington DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2016. http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/812231.pdf

    Adults drank too much and drove about 121 million times per year – over 300,000 incidents of drinking and driving a day.

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Alcohol-Impaired Driving Among Adults — United States, 2012.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. August 7, 2015 / 64(30);814-817. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6430a2.htm

    50 to 75 percent of convicted drunk drivers continue to drive on a suspended license.

    (Peck, R.C., Wilson, R. J., and Sutton, L. 1995. “Driver license strategies for controlling the persistent DUI offender, Strategies for Dealing with the intent Drinking Driver.” Transportation Research Board, Transportation Research Circular No. 437. Washington, D.C. National Research Council: 48-49 and Beck, KH, et al. “Effects of Ignition Interlock License Restrictions on Drivers with Multiple…

    About one-third of all drivers arrested or convicted of drunk driving are repeat offenders.

    (Fell, Jim. “Repeat DWI Offenders in the United States.” Washington, DC: National Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Traffic Tech No. 85, February 1995.)

    MADD has helped save nearly 30,000 young lives through passage of the 21 minimum drinking age law.

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Lives Saved in 2011 by Restraint Use and Minimum Drinking Age Laws”. DOT 811 169. Washington DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2012. http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/811702.pdf

    Every day in America, another 29 people die as a result of drunk driving crashes. That’s one person every 50 minutes.

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Traffic Safety Facts 2016: Alcohol-Impaired Driving.” Washington DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2017. https://crashstats.nhtsa.dot.gov/Api/Public/ViewPublication/812450

    Drunk driving costs each adult in the united states over $500 per year.

    MADD 5th Anniversary Report to the Nation, 2011. http://www.talklikemadd.org/books/statereport/#/4/

    Each day, people drive drunk more than 300,000 times, but only about 3200 are arrested.

    Arrest data: Federal Bureau of Investigation, “Crime in the United States: 2014” https://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2014/crime-in-the-u.s.-2014/tables/table-29 Incidence data: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Alcohol-Impaired Driving Among Adults — United States, 2012.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. August 7, 2015 / 64(30);814-817. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6430a2.htm

    In 2014, three times as many males were arrested for drunk driving as females (401,904 vs 130,480).

    Federal Bureau of Investigation, Crime in the United States: 2014. https://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2014/crime-in-the-u.s.-2014/tables/table-33

    The drug showing the greatest increase among drivers from 2007 to 2013/2014 was marijuana (THC). The percentage of THC-positive drivers increased from 8.6 percent in 2007 to 12.6 percent in 2013/2014, a proportional increase of 47 percent.

    (NHTSA 2013-2014 Roadside Survey)

    In 2016, 10,497 people died in drunk driving crashes – one every 50 minutes – and 290,000 were injured in drunk driving crashes.

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Traffic Safety Facts 2016: Alcohol-Impaired Driving.” Washington DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2017. https://crashstats.nhtsa.dot.gov/Api/Public/ViewPublication/812450

    An average drunk driver has driven drunk over 80 times before first arrest.

    Arrest data: Federal Bureau of Investigation, “Crime in the United States: 2014” https://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2014/crime-in-the-u.s.-2014/tables/table-29 Incidence data: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Alcohol-Impaired Driving Among Adults — United States, 2012.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. August 7, 2015 / 64(30);814-817. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6430a2.htm

    Over 1.1 million drivers were arrested in 2014 for driving under the influence of alcohol or narcotics.

    Federal Bureau of Investigation, “Crime in the United States: 2014.” https://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2014/crime-in-the-u.s.-2014/tables/table-29 ;



  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @WordsMatter

    @MayCaesar

    https://www.verywellmind.com/why-do-teens-use-marijuana-63543

    "Why Marijuana Use in Teens Is Harmful

    Misinformation About the Risks of Weed

    Some kids begin using marijuana because they have not be informed of the harm it can do to them while their brains and minds are still not fully developed. Or more often, they make a decision to begin using based on misinformation.

    The marijuana legalization movement has played a role in sending a mixed message to young people. Teens today might believe "if it's medicine, it must be safe" or "if it's legal, it must be OK."

    But, nowhere that marijuana has been made legal for medical or recreational use has it been made legal for anyone under that age of 21. Not even the most adamant legalization advocates propose making it legal for children to use.

    If you are a parent who wants to protect your children from the dangers associated with early marijuana use, educate them with the facts so that they can make an informed decision about the risks."

  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @WordsMatter

    @MayCaesar

    https://www.pbs.org/video/what-s-next-for-marijuana-legalization-1487379153/

    This video is 9mins and 13 secs long.

    The pro marijuana talking points are obvious, (but something else is obvious as well, and I'll leave that point of view alone for the time being.)
  • @TTKDB

    No. I am not a weed smoker. Parents opposed to pot?!?!? What is this supposed to mean to me? At what point did you think that was a logical argument? I don't care what a bunch of upper middle class soccer moms think about smoking pot. My rights are not legally subject to peoples opinions, it's subject to the law alone. You have no real argument to sit on right now. You're just arguing for the sake of arguing. It's called diarrhea of the mouth. You're traffic statistics are bunk, and all you've got now is a bunch of privileged WASPs who say it's bad to smoke pot because they think they somehow know what's best for us all.  I get it though. You're one of those self important middle class types too, aren't you? I'll bet you don't even know what ramen noodles taste like, do ya? It's always amazed me to see that your type could even form cognotive sentences with that silver spoon stuck in your mouth. That takes discipline. Some people on this site might refer to that as privileged, while others may call it a social sickness. It's a type of sickness that inhibits the realization that when you don't have any good arguments, you should just stand aside and let the big boys and girls do the real debating. 
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer

    "Parents opposed to pot?!?!? What is this supposed to mean to me?"

    Below is the link to the site

    This website makes available all sorts of constructive and educational material, that a parent or parents, or the youth in the United States could gain lots of meaning from.

     "At what point did you think that was a logical argument? I don't care what a bunch of upper middle class soccer moms think about smoking pot. My rights are not legally subject to peoples opinions, it's subject to the law alone. You have no real argument to sit on right now."


    http://www.poppot.org/

    "Bursting the bubble of marijuana hype."

    Check out the website, these are some of the articles from their website:

    HEADLINES BRING UP MORE MARIJUANA – RELATED BEHAVIOR


    FORMER NYT WRITER’S NEW BOOK WARNS OF MARIJUANA, VIOLENCE, MENTAL ILLNESS


    MARIJUANA IS THE COMMON WEB BETWEEN SO MANY MASS KILLERS


    MEDICAL STUDIES DOCUMENT DANGERS RELATED TO MARIJUANA

    The above arguments, gives the rest of society all sorts of arguments to make, don't they? 
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer

    "You're just arguing for the sake of arguing. It's called diarrhea of the mouth. You're traffic statistics are bunk, and all you've got now is a bunch of privileged WASPs who say it's bad to smoke pot because they think they somehow know what's best for us all.  I get it though. You're one of those self important middle class types too, aren't you? I'll bet you don't even know what ramen noodles taste like, do ya? It's always amazed me to see that your type could even form cognotive sentences with that silver spoon stuck in your mouth. That takes discipline. Some people on this site might refer to that as privileged, while others may call it a social sickness. It's a type of sickness that inhibits the realization that when you don't have any good arguments, you should just stand aside and let the big boys and girls do the real debating."



    HEART BREAKING NEWS: 122 CHILD DEATHS RELATED TO MARIJUANA

       

    Death Toll Now Reaches 122!

    PopPot.org is monitoring news reports of child deaths that have occurred since Colorado legalized recreational marijuana.

       

    Click Here for Downloadable Handout:     Child Deaths Related to Marijuana

    @piloteer

    What are your thoughts on the above? 

    Download the handout, and you can see the information yourself. 


  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer

    @WordsMatter

    @MayCaesar

    How do you feel about some of the parents making a choice to smoke weed around the kids, or families? 

    The legalization of weed, somehow gives an adult the right to smoke weed around kids or families? 

    What about the kids rights, or the rights of the rest of the family, who maybe disagree with an adult using weed around them under the same roof? 

    How do you feel about some of the weed smoking teenagers introducing weed for the first time to other teenagers who haven't been exposed to weed before? 

    The legalization of recreational and medical weed is supposed to help keep recreational weed out of the hands of the teenagers? 

    Could it be, that the legalization of recreational weed laws, are getting just as ignored by the recreational weed users, just as the laws making weed illegal were ignored by many? 



  • TTKDB said:
    How do you feel about some of the parents making a choice to smoke weed around the kids, or families? 

    The legalization of weed, somehow gives an adult the right to smoke weed around kids or families? 

    What about the kids rights, or the rights of the rest of the family, who maybe disagree with an adult using weed around them under the same roof? 

    How do you feel about some of the weed smoking teenagers introducing weed for the first time to other teenagers who haven't been exposed to weed before? 

    The legalization of recreational and medical weed is supposed to help keep recreational weed out of the hands of the teenagers? 

    Could it be, that the legalization of recreational weed laws, are getting just as ignored by the recreational weed users, just as the laws making weed illegal were ignored by many? 



    I truly don't care about any of those questions at all. None of those scenarios bother me in the slightest. Before you make your dumb comment of "well call up X and see how they feel about it" I don't care how they feel and it wouldn't change that none of these things bother me in the slightest.
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @WordsMatter

    "I truly don't care about any of those questions at all. None of those scenarios bother me in the slightest. Before you make your dumb comment of "well call up X and see how they feel about it" I don't care how they feel and it wouldn't change that none of these things bother me in the slightest."

    The below aren't scenario's.

    This is real life:
    So kids growing up around a parents recreational weed use, doesn't bother you at all?

    This is real life:
    Or a teenager whos breaking the law making weed legal, but not legal to them? And apparently someone still acting as a dealer in a sense, and is still supplying the teenager with weed, and then enabling other teenagers with weed as well, behind the parents back who likely don't agree with their kid being around or being enabled by another kid with weed? 

    This is real life:
    So you don't care about a teenager breaking the law and enabling another kid with weed? 

    And those parents, who want nothing to do with weed, you don't a care for them either right? 

    The below is real life:

    And after you saw this post as well, 

    HEART BREAKING NEWS: 122 CHILD DEATHS RELATED TO MARIJUANA


    Death Toll Now Reaches 122!

    PopPot.org is monitoring news reports of child deaths that have occurred since Colorado legalized recreational marijuana.

       

    Click Here for Downloadable Handout:     Child Deaths Related to Marijuana


    @WordsMatter

    Do you have any care for the above situation? 


    The below website, is real life, and the people on it, are real life also.

    http://www.poppot.org/

  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    https://www-nbcnews-com.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/www.nbcnews.com/news/amp/ncna878986?amp_js_v=a2&amp_gsa=1&usqp=mq331AQHCAFYAYABAQ==#aoh=15442140799749&csi=1&referrer=https://www.google.com&amp_tf=From %1$s&ampshare=https://www.nbcnews.com/business/consumer/growing-number-fatal-car-crashes-linked-drug-use-n878986 

    "Growing number of fatal car crashes linked to drug use

    Some people think marijuana or opioids don’t impair their ability to drive — and some even believe these drugs make them safer drivers.

    “Drugs can impair, and drug-impaired drivers can crash,” said the report's author, Dr. Jim Hedlund, a former senior official with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “But it’s impossible to understand the full scope of the drugged driving problem because many drivers who are arrested or involved in crashes, even those who are killed, are not tested for drugs. Drivers who are drug-positive may not necessarily be impaired.”

    Authorities in the U.S. and abroad have aggressively cracked down on drunken driving over the last several decades. It is relatively easy to test motorists to determine whether they are under the influence of alcohol and determine whether it was a factor in a crash.

    The research found that the simultaneous use of multiple drugs is becoming more common.

    But what federal data shows is that, where tests were performed, 44 percent of drivers fatally injured in a crash tested positive for drugs in 2016, up from 28 percent a decade earlier. Of those who tested positive for drugs in the latest study, 38 percent had used marijuana, 16 percent had used some form of opioid, and 4 percent tested positive for a combination of both.

    The research found that the simultaneous use of multiple drugs is becoming more common. Of the drivers killed in crashes in 2016 who were found to be using alcohol, 49 percent also tested positive for drugs.

    “Alcohol-impaired driving and drug-impaired driving can no longer be treated as separate issues,” said Ralph Blackman, president and CEO of Responsibility.org, a Virginia-based nonprofit focused on drunken driving. While the use of alcohol by motorists was responsible for 28 percent of all U.S. traffic fatalities in 2016, Blackman said, “We have to think about the combination of substances drivers are often putting into their systems at the same time.”

    “Research has demonstrated the potential of marijuana to impair driving-related skills,” NHTSA advised Congress in a report last July, while noting that it can be difficult to determine when a driver using marijuana is unfit to be behind the wheel. It also questioned the accuracy of tests used to determine how much THC — the active ingredient in cannabis — is in the blood.

    Nonetheless, the GHSA says the issue of drug driving cannot be ignored. It calls for new testing procedures, an increase in public awareness campaigns, and increased law enforcement.

    “Too many people operate under the false belief that marijuana or opioids don’t impair their ability to drive, or even that these drugs make them safer drivers,” said GHSA Executive Director Jonathan Adkins. “Busting this myth requires states to expand their impaired driving campaigns to include marijuana and opioids along with alcohol to show drivers that impairment is impairment, regardless of substance.” 

  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @WordsMatter

    @piloteer

    @MayCaesar

    https://www-denverpost-com.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/www.denverpost.com/2018/03/25/colorado-auto-deaths-marijuana-use/amp/?amp_js_v=a2&amp_gsa=1&usqp=mq331AQHCAFYAYABAQ==#referrer=https://www.google.com&amp_tf=From %1$s&ampshare=https://www.denverpost.com/2018/03/25/colorado-auto-deaths-marijuana-use/ 

    Some excerpts from the article: 

    "As Colorado auto deaths involving marijuana rise, CDOT is asking thousands how they feel about driving under pot’s influence

    Amid a rise in Colorado auto fatalities involving marijuana, state transportation officials are surveying thousands of residents this year to better understand public attitudes toward driving under the influence of pot, with the hopes of blunting the increasingly deadly trend.

    The Cannabis Conversation, a campaign led by the Colorado Department of Transportation, law enforcement and the marijuana industry, launched this year. It held its first open house in the metro area Wednesday at Denver’s Montclair Recreation Center, and there will be more meetings in Fort Collins, Pueblo and Denver in the coming weeks.

    The number of marijuana-related automobile fatalities in Colorado, as measured by the drug’s chief psychoactive ingredient, hit 77 in 2016, the latest in a series of sharp increases in recent years. Fifty-one of those drivers had levels of that substance, called Delta 9 THC, above the threshold for cannabis impairment under Colorado law. 

    And according to a survey done by CDOT last year, just over half of marijuana users said they had gotten behind the wheel of a vehicle in the last 30 days within two hours of using the drug. That percentage was little changed from the response to the same question a year earlier.

    “That’s really troubling to us,” CDOT communications manager Sam Cole told an audience gathered at a Lowry neighborhood recreation center last week. “We’re a little frustrated we’re not moving the needle on driver behavior.”

    People at the meeting were asked to share their thoughts on driving under pot’s influence by using whiteboards and computer questionnaires and even by dropping stones into mason jars corresponding to certain questions about marijuana and vehicular use.

    In the campaign’s online component, a survey has already yielded 10,000 responses, according to CDOT — data that will be assembled, unwrapped and analyzed this summer.

    “We want to better understand why some users of marijuana don’t take the dangers of driving more seriously — and what we could say to make them change their minds,” said Cole in an interview with The Denver Post. “We want to get into the heads of marijuana users.”

    Marijuana-related automobile fatalities still lag significantly behind alcohol-related fatalities — 8 percent versus 26 percent, respectively, of the state’s 608 total road fatalities in 2016 — but Glenn Davis, CDOT’s highway safety manager, isn’t resting easy."

  • @TTKDB did you not understand my above post where I already responded to all those questions? No I don't care about any of those enough to think weed should be illegal.
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @WordsMatter

    "did you not understand my above post where I already responded to all those questions? No I don't care about any of those enough to think weed should be illegal."

    Does the legalization of weed, make the life of the drug user better?

    Or does weed legalization a betterment to society overall?

    The weed users using weed around kids, and other family members below the age of 21 is wrong.


  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    Correction: 

    Or is weed legalization a betterment to society overall? 

    Let me get this straight, you care enough about weed, enough to where it shouldn't be illegal?

    Do you care about recreational weed, above everything else?



  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    https://www-nbcnews-com.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/www.nbcnews.com/news/amp/ncna726081?amp_js_v=a2&amp_gsa=1&usqp=mq331AQHCAFYAYABAQ==#referrer=https://www.google.com&amp_tf=From %1$s&ampshare=https://www.nbcnews.com/health/kids-health/pediatricians-warn-against-pot-use-not-your-dad-s-marijuana-n726081 

    "Pediatricians Warn Against Pot Use: Not Your Dad's Marijuana


    By The Associated Press

    CHICAGO — An influential doctors group is beefing up warnings about marijuana's potential harms for teens amid increasingly lax laws and attitudes on pot use.

    Many parents use the drug and think it's OK for their kids, but "we would rather not mess around with the developing brain," said Dr. Seth Ammerman.

    The advice comes in a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics, published Monday in Pediatrics. The group opposes medical and recreational marijuana use for kids. It says emphasizing that message is important because most states have legalized medical use for adults, and many have decriminalized or legalized adults' recreational use.

    Those trends have led parents to increasingly ask doctors about kids' use, said Ammerman, a Stanford University pediatrics professor who co-wrote the report.

    "Parents will say, 'I use it moderately and I'm fine with it, so it's really benign and not a problem if my kid uses it,'" he said.

    Doctors need to know how to respond to that thinking, and parents and teens need to know the risks, Ammerman said.

    POTENTIAL HARMS

    The brain continues to develop until the early 20s, raising concerns about the potential short- and long-term effects of a mind-altering drug. Some studies suggest that teens who use marijuana at least 10 times a month develop changes in brain regions affecting memory and the ability to plan. Some changes may be permanent, the report says.

    Frequent use starting in the early teen years may lower IQ scores, and some studies have shown that starting marijuana use at a young age is more likely to lead to addiction than starting in adulthood. Not all teen users develop these problems and some may be more vulnerable because of genetics or other factors.

    MEDICAL VERSUS RECREATIONAL USE

    Solid research on medical marijuana's effects in children and teens is lacking, although some studies have suggested it may benefit kids with hard-to-treat seizures. The report says other potential benefits, doses and effects are mostly unknown.

    Recreational use is illegal for those under age 21 even in states that allow adult use. Parents should avoid using marijuana in front of their kids and should keep all marijuana products stored out of kids' sight, the academy says. Some young children who accidentally swallowed their parents' pot-containing cookies or drinks have landed in the emergency room for mostly minor symptoms although some developed breathing problems.

    WHO'S USING

    Government data show that almost 40 percent of U.S. high school students have tried marijuana, about 20 percent are current users and close to 10 percent first tried it before age 13. Use has increased in recent years among those aged 18 and older but not among young teens. Still, kids aged 12-17 increasingly think that marijuana use is not harmful.

    Dr. Sheryl Ryan, a Yale University pediatrics professor and lead author of the academy report, said marijuana "is the drug of choice" for many of her teen patients in New Haven, Connecticut. Some think daily use is safe, noting that their parents or grandparents smoked pot in college and turned out OK. But today's marijuana is much more potent and potentially more risky, Ryan said."



  • @TTKDB

    Now I see where you've picked up your misinformed opinion. I've visited the "poppot.org site. I find it funny that they cannot actually give any information on the supposed 122 deaths of children that has occurred. They can only show us about 10 or 11 deaths that occurred because of neglect, not marijuana. They also try and convince people that 122 deaths occurred in Colorado after marijuana was legalized there, but out of the few instances they do point to, many happened in states where marijuana was not even legal, like Florida for instance. Then they try to go on and say that legalizing marijuana will only cause these numbers to rise, but of course they don't back that up with any facts. Just so you know, it's not like any of us don't understand how easy it is to look up anti marijuana groups and try and push their agenda. What's noticeably missing from your posts is a good argument.(that tends to be a theme with all your posts). I DARE you to try and come up with a good argument all on your own, without reverting to disinformation to fuel your argument. Try and do that without falling on your face, then I may consider your arguments to be valid. I get the feeling though that I will be underwhelmed.
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer

    Does it irk your intergrity, that "parents opposed to pot" exists? 

    Does it irk your intergrity that there are parents who don't want their kids being exposed to weed by a teenage drug user? 

    Are you pro drug user?

    Are you pro drug addict? 

    Are you ok with parents using weed and getting high with and around their kids? 

    Parents getting high on weed and their underaged kids getting high with them is misinformation?

    Are you ok with weed addicts getting high in a grocery store or mall parking lot, and then putting their vehicles in gear and then driving drugged up on weed, this placing the lives of the sober drivers and their families in danger, because the drug addict decided to drive illegally while high on weed? 


  • @TTKDB

    I am absolutely fine with people getting high around their kids, as long as they're not getting the kids high. It certainly does not "irk my integrity" that poppot.org exists, I have no integrity to be irked. Now I get to call you out as a blatant liar, marijuana is proven to not be physically addicting, so you CAN'T be a " marijuana addict". Coffee is physically addicting, not marijuana. If parents are getting high with their kids, they're breaking the law, but that's no reason to ban it for everybody else. People are not allowed to get high in grocery stores, that's also a blatant liar fabricated by you. If you can't drink in public, you can't smoke marijuana in public. 

    PLEASE FOR ONCE MAKE A VALID ARGUMENT. If you want I can private message you and give you some pointers? Why'd you ignore my friend request by the way? If we were friends it wouldn't be so awkward for me to private message you with help on your arguments.
  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer

    I've witnessed two teenagers walking with little kids, and they were getting high on weed, because the swisher sweet cigar that they were sharing between them had weed in it.

    Would you call that exemplary babysitting? 

    On another occasion, at a grocery store parking lot, people were getting high in their cars, anywhere from 2-3 cars at a time.

    And this happened fairly often to the point, a sheriffs deputy was walking a beat along the front of the store, and sometimes he would walk into the parking lot, and those cars would drive away, when he started his walk into the parking lot.


  • TTKDBTTKDB 200 Pts
    @piloteer


    "Now I get to call you out as a blatant liar, marijuana is proven to not be physically addicting, so you CAN'T be a " marijuana addict". Coffee is physically addicting, not marijuana."

    You want to pull the coffee card, to defend your marijuana point of view?

    If the weed addicts are using weed everyday:
    (like getting high before going to their jobs, or while getting high while on their break at work, or while smoking a joint while droving home from work, "imagine if that weed user, works at a hospital." Is it fair to the patients if a hospital worker is high on weed, while attending to their patients? 
    Is it fair if any employee is drinking alcohol or smoking weed during their lunch breaks, while at work?)
    Just like a smoker smokes tobacco each day, or the alcohol abuser's drink alcohol each day, thats the very definition of addiction.

    I drink coffee, but in my experience, some of the pro weed crowd, and some of the weed users themselves, are the primary individuals who use "coffee" to defend recreational weed use with.


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