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Does socialsism just work in an ethnostate?
in Politics

By billbatardbillbatard 105 Pts
In other words does the nordic model simply work because northern europeans are smarter and hard working than the rest of the world..and because they will make sacrifices for people like themselves, but it all breaks down when the money get spent on foreigners who are lazy and rape blondes? If democratic socialism is so bad, why is Norway so great? or is it so great because it is so homgeneoius? tell me what you think .. https://theweek.com/articles/783700/democratic-socialism-bad-why-norway-great maybe it isnt socialsim thats so great maybe its just these people that are so great Image result for socialist scandinavian countrieshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyiY6DEwly8
AlofRI
The passion for destruction is also a creative passion. Mikhail Bakunin




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  • MayCaesarMayCaesar 1449 Pts
    1. Nordic model is capitalist, not socialist.

    2. Homogeneity of the population is not known to correlate with its success in any meaningful way.

    3. People there are better than in the majority of the world, but that alone does not determine everything. The combination of their high cultures and functional political and economical systems is what they have to thank.

    4. They do not make any more sacrifices than other developed nations, and their immigration systems are extremely strict. The refugee crisis was an exception, and the response to it was more a product of necessity than good will.
    When I was choosing my immigration destination, I looked briefly at that region. It is a deep forest as far as immigration goes, and even Japan seems easier to settle in, than those places.
    Zombieguy1987
  • @MayCaesar the nordics are more socialists than people want to admit http://mattbruenig.com/2017/07/28/nordic-socialism-is-realer-than-you-think/  http://mattbruenig.com/2017/07/28/nordic-socialism-is-realer-than-you-think/State Ownership

    Even more interesting than Nordic labor market institutions is Nordic state ownership. Collective ownership over capital is the hallmark of that old-school socialism that is supposed to have been entirely discredited. And yet, such public ownership figures prominently in present-day Norway and Finland and has had a role in the other two Nordic countries as well, especially in Sweden where the government embarked upon a now-defunct plan to socialize the whole of Swedish industry into wage-earner funds just a few decades ago.

    The governments of Norway and Finland own financial assets equal to 330 percent and 130 percent of each country’s respective GDP. In the US, the same figure is just 26 percent.

     Finland: 129.3

    Much of this money is tied up in diversified wealth funds, which some would object to as not counting as real state ownership. I disagree with the claim that wealth funds are not really state ownership, but the observation that Nordic countries feature high levels of state ownership does not turn upon this quibble.

    State-owned enterprises (SOEs), defined as commercial enterprises in which the state has a controlling stake or large minority stake, are also far more prevalent in the Nordic countries. In 2012, the value of Norwegian SOEs was equal to 87.9 percent of the country’s GDP. For Finland, that figure was 52.3 percent. In the US, it was not even 1 percent.


    Some of these SOEs are businesses often run by states: a postal service, a public broadcasting channel, an Alcohol retail monopoly. But others are just normal businesses typically associated with the private sector.


    In Finland, where I know the situation the best, there are 64 state-owned enterprises, including one called Solidium that operates as a holding company for the government’s minority stake in 13 of the companies.

    ome of these SOEs are businesses often run by states: a postal service, a public broadcasting channel, an Alcohol retail monopoly. But others are just normal businesses typically associated with the private sector.

    In Finland, where I know the situation the best, there are 64 state-owned enterprises, including one called Solidium that operates as a holding company for the government’s minority stake in 13 of the companies.

    The Finnish state-owned enterprises include an airliner called Finnair; a wine and spirits maker called Altia; a marketing communications company called Nordic Morning; a large construction and engineering company called VR; and an $8.8 billion oil company called Neste.



    In Norway, the state manages direct ownership of 70 companies. The businesses include the real estate company Entra; the country’s largest financial services group DNB; the 30,000-employee mobile telecommunications company Telenor; and the famous state-owned oil company Statoil.

    Finland and Norway have their special reasons for the level of state ownership they engage in. Finnish government publications discuss the country’s late development and status as a peripheral country when justifying their relatively heavy public involvement in industry. That is, Finland does not want to expose the entirety of its marginal, late-developing, open economy to the potential ravages of international capital flows.

    In Norway, the discovery of oil in the North Sea was the impetus for the creation of its enormous social wealth fund. The fund currently owns around $950 billion of assets throughout the world, including more than $325 billion of assets inside the US. In a video on the Norwegian central bank’s website, the fund is described as follows: “It is the people’s money, owned by everyone, divided equally and for generations to come.”


    http://mattbruenig.com/2017/07/28/nordic-socialism-is-realer-than-you-think/

    AlofRI
    The passion for destruction is also a creative passion. Mikhail Bakunin

  • @MayCaesar the nordics are more socialists than people want to admit http://mattbruenig.com/2017/07/28/nordic-socialism-is-realer-than-you-think/  http://mattbruenig.com/2017/07/28/nordic-socialism-is-realer-than-you-think/State Ownership

    Even more interesting than Nordic labor market institutions is Nordic state ownership. Collective ownership over capital is the hallmark of that old-school socialism that is supposed to have been entirely discredited. And yet, such public ownership figures prominently in present-day Norway and Finland and has had a role in the other two Nordic countries as well, especially in Sweden where the government embarked upon a now-defunct plan to socialize the whole of Swedish industry into wage-earner funds just a few decades ago.

    The governments of Norway and Finland own financial assets equal to 330 percent and 130 percent of each country’s respective GDP. In the US, the same figure is just 26 percent.

     Finland: 129.3

    Much of this money is tied up in diversified wealth funds, which some would object to as not counting as real state ownership. I disagree with the claim that wealth funds are not really state ownership, but the observation that Nordic countries feature high levels of state ownership does not turn upon this quibble.

    State-owned enterprises (SOEs), defined as commercial enterprises in which the state has a controlling stake or large minority stake, are also far more prevalent in the Nordic countries. In 2012, the value of Norwegian SOEs was equal to 87.9 percent of the country’s GDP. For Finland, that figure was 52.3 percent. In the US, it was not even 1 percent.


    Some of these SOEs are businesses often run by states: a postal service, a public broadcasting channel, an Alcohol retail monopoly. But others are just normal businesses typically associated with the private sector.



    AlofRI
    The passion for destruction is also a creative passion. Mikhail Bakunin

  • AlofRIAlofRI 153 Pts
    Socialism, an economic model with faults, cannot work alone or with an authoritarian government. Capitalism, an economic model with faults, cannot work, unregulated, without SPAWNING an authoritarian oligarchy … as it has in Russia. Socialism, to work, has to be a part of a democracy, capitalism, to work, has to be regulated, constrained SOMEWHAT to prevent it from OWNING (buying), whatever system it is a part of … as in the U.S.. It HAS to carry its portion of the tax burden that allows the country it is in to flourish …. thereby creating a lucrative market for its products. We need all three, democracy first, capitalism to flourish and socialism to protect equality and the workers.

    C'mon! Does ANYBODY really believe Bernie wants to turn our democracy into a communist country??????? If you do, … can we talk?? There's this "bridge"....
  • Socialism is a concept that one greedy intelligent man can tear down. It is unstable and will undoubtedly lead to rise in communism.
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