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Modern day feminism isn't about equality
in Politics

By AlekseySalazAlekseySalaz 22 Pts
I believe in women's rights and would be a feminist but they took a dark turn and now seem to hate white men and act extremely oppressed even though they are afforded the same rights as men (this is of course in america)
Zombieguy1987



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  • Modern feminism isn't about anything. Even your negative characterization of it is inaccurate. There is no policy, no group, no leaders, no clear manifesto. Instead we have hundreds of groups and ideologies who all claim to be feminists yet have often opposing views and goals. Feminists will claim doing porn and sex work is liberating and empowering if it's consensual. Other feminists will argue that porn and sex work are inherently abusive and misogynistic. Feminists will support that trans women are real women. Feminists will say trans women aren't women. Feminists are pro choice. Feminists are pro life. Feminists say the hijab is oppressive. Feminists say the hijab is a way a woman can express herself and religion.

    Feminism has lost all meaning as a title. All it is, is a self imposed descriptor that doesn't actually tell you a single thing about the persons views. It carries absolutely no weight anymore.
    PlaffelvohfenZeusAres42
  • MayCaesarMayCaesar 1872 Pts
    There is a lot of buzzwords nowadays that are used in all possible contexts, often mutually contradictory. Some of such words are: feminist, socialist, Nazi, vegetarian, human right activist, nationalist... Whenever one of these labels is used, you have to be extra careful as to what the implied meaning of the word is.

    The important aspect of language, however, is that wrong usage of a word does not change the actual meaning of the word. Just because a lot of people call themselves feminist, does not mean that every single one of them is actually feminist. The word "feminist" has a very clear definition, and you will find that a lot of self-called feminists nowadays do not satisfy that definition.

    Just because a state is called Democratic People's Republic of Korea, does not mean that it is democratic, people's or a republic. Similarly, just because some organisation calls itself "Feminists of Arizona for equality", does not mean that its members are feminists and that its agenda has anything to do with equality.
  • CYDdhartaCYDdharta 1162 Pts
    MayCaesar said:
    There is a lot of buzzwords nowadays that are used in all possible contexts, often mutually contradictory. Some of such words are: feminist, socialist, Nazi, vegetarian, human right activist, nationalist... Whenever one of these labels is used, you have to be extra careful as to what the implied meaning of the word is.

    The important aspect of language, however, is that wrong usage of a word does not change the actual meaning of the word. Just because a lot of people call themselves feminist, does not mean that every single one of them is actually feminist. The word "feminist" has a very clear definition, and you will find that a lot of self-called feminists nowadays do not satisfy that definition.

    Just because a state is called Democratic People's Republic of Korea, does not mean that it is democratic, people's or a republic. Similarly, just because some organisation calls itself "Feminists of Arizona for equality", does not mean that its members are feminists and that its agenda has anything to do with equality.

    While what you've posted is common-sensical, it seems such concrete language usage is often under assault.  Marriage used to have a very clear definition, now no so much, and whatever meaning it still has is still under further assault.
  • @CYDdharta "attacks on marriage" is totally unrelated here but I'll indulge you. However first I need to understand what attacks you are speaking of. Is it gay marriage? Is it wives taking more of a role outside the home? Is it men doing more work in child-rearing? What exactly have been the attacks?
    Plaffelvohfen
  • CYDdhartaCYDdharta 1162 Pts
    @CYDdharta "attacks on marriage" is totally unrelated here but I'll indulge you. However first I need to understand what attacks you are speaking of. Is it gay marriage? Is it wives taking more of a role outside the home? Is it men doing more work in child-rearing? What exactly have been the attacks?

    The attacks were so successful you don't even know what the word used to mean.  Marriage meant "The act of uniting a man and woman for life; wedlock; the legal union of a man and woman for life."
  • ThiefThief 12 Pts
    Hello,

    Before I begin writing an argument for feminism and as to why feminism is, completely about equality. First I will present on how 'feminism' is defined from the Cambridge Dictionary.com¹ website, and then an interpretation from a non-lexicographical perspective - my own.

    Cambridge Dictionary definition for 'feminism': 'The belief that women should be allowed the same rights, power, and opportunities as men and be treated in the same way, or the set of activities intended to achieve this state.'

    Thief's interpretation - redefinition of feminism: Feminism [fēmina²: 'woman', ism: for sense of 'woman's movement'] originated from France in the late 19th century [as feminisme]. The word feminisme was firstly used by French socialist, Charles' Fourier³ as a word to illustrate women into his vision of the emancipation of women in Charles' Fourier's Utopian vision. Three distinguishing historical events must be pointed out. The first-wave feminism, second-wave feminism, and third-wave feminism: though some might argue that we are currently in the fourth-wave feminism.

    The first movement (the term; first-wave feminism was coined by Martha Weinman Lear. She had used it in the New York Times' Magazine and commonly wrote about the second-wave feminism movement) for women's rights was on July 19-20, 1948: New York, Wesleyan Chapel; Seneca Falls - known as the 'first-wave feminism*' - it was commonly known as a legality issue; suffrage rights and property rights. About gender equality, which lasted from the mid-19th century through to the early 20th century . . . specifically 1848-1920 - which in 1920, was when the nineteenth amendment to the United States Constitution was installed - that granted them the right to vote and that was typically known as the end of the first-wave feminism.

    Second-wave feminism** began in the early 1960's (Assumable, though controversial, to suspect that it started in 1963, with the publication from Betty Friedan titled 'The Feminine Mystique' and the President of the United States, John Fitzgerald Kennedy released a report about gender inequality.) [that started in the United States and that spread throughout the western hemisphere] and persisted for 20 more years (ended in the early 1980's) of feminist activity - which focused beyond the scope of just enfranchisement, and rallied towards an increase in equality, ranging from issues such as domestic violence, to official legal inequalities; "equal legal and social rights***". The list of problems are as follows: "sexuality, family, the workplace, reproductive rights, de facto inequalities†". Though thought was emphasised on the issues [are as follows]: domestic violence, marital rape, engendered rape-crisis centres, and women's shelters†† - there were also changes to divorce law and custody law.

    The third wave of feminism, that began in the 1990's through to 2010 [the introduction of the fourth wave of feminism (2010)] (third-wave feminism), is described as being more empowering for women of colour and for the LGBT+§ community than the previous waves of feminism; set to redefine what it meant to be a feminist (first-wave feminism, second-wave feminism), and focuses more on these issues to do with women of colour and the LGBT+ community - individualism and diversity.

    Third-wave feminism was adopted by the feminist punk subculture, riot grrrl [in 1990] in Olympia, Washington. The movement created feminist zines, art and spoke about rape, patriarchy, sexuality and female empowerment. Criticism on the third wave of feminism was that it was too ethnocentric; white feminists were solely focused on suffrage and that it only benefited their own. Other critiques had argued that the idea of belly shirts and pornography was a patriarchal construct and that it was a reversal [of femininity back to the first-wave feminism]; a disguised view of patriarchal beliefs. Contrary to this, third-wave feminists had argued that it was empowering and that it was free self-expression for women; the freedom to choose.

    The controversial fourth-wave feminism occurred in the year 2012 [or], during 2010-2012 - [criticism] some scholars believe that third-wave feminism is still occurring and that fourth-wave feminism does not exist.

    Fourth-wave feminism is described as being interlocked with social stratification for the traditionally marginalised social groups. Fourth-wave feminists advocate that a more equitable opportunity would arise if they incorporated the perspectives of all people, pertaining to policies and practices related to business and politics. Issues like sexual harassment (including street harassment), work discrimination and harassment, body shaming, sexual imagery [usually in the media], online misogyny, campus sexual assault, and assault on public transport are key factors during the fourth wave of feminism.

    Argument presentation: many feminism ideologies exist throughout the world, but three of them will be suffice to articulate and present what I wish to convey on feminism.


    Mainstream feminism (bourgeois feminism): a feminism ideology that derives its place from mid 19th century through to the early 20th century; commonly known as the first wave of feminism, that focused on suffrage for women. Today's meaning of the term is commonly associated with 'branding', 'commercialisation' and an attempt to sell products to so-called feminists - celebrities like Taylor Swift are at the forefront of this feminist movement.

    Radical feminism: radical feminism; or what some might pejoratively consider as, 'feminazi's'. Are a radicalisation; abolition; revolutionary deconstruction of the economic and social systemic structures. Radical feminists believe that the societal and economic systems are a patriarchal devise constituted for the use of oppressors; the privileged - associated with [white] men. Prostitution and pornography are prevalent details in the radicalism feminism.

    Postcolonial feminism. Or, also known as third-world feminism, womanism, Africana womanism, motherism, Stiwanism, negofeminism, chicana feminism, and also femalism: postcolonial feminism is a cause that had been introduced in the 1980's . . . [R]acism and the "long lasting§" political, economic, cultural effects on the non-white, non-western women on the postcolonial era. The argument towards postcolonial feminism is that non-white, non-westerners are being ostracised/left-out of the feminism movement, and that those that are not white are not being respected for the values that they hold - culturally, and are considered as 'other'. Mainstream feminism argues that postcolonial feminism is splitting the movement [towards a better place] for women as a confusing unintelligible ism - movement.

    Whilst postcolonial feminism has revealed and illustrated strong points of concern to the public and has contributed feminism. Scholars have devised a new term that better incorporates the prevalent perils that non-white and non-westerners face: transnational feminism.

    Transnational feminism, or what transnational feminism practitioners and theorists sometimes like to rephrase as: transnational feminisms, transnational feminist praxis, or transnational practices. 'Transnational feminism' [the term] originated from Inderpal Grewal and Caren Kaplan in 1994 in their seminal text 'Scattered Hegemonies: Postmodernity and Transnational Feminist Practices'.

    Transnational feminism removes layers of differences from the postcolonial feminism actions and the disputes that arose from mainstream feminism verses postcolonial feminism. Transnational feminism brings First World and Third World countries together - but differentiates the problems of First and Third World countries; separating and acknowledging - accept[ing] the diversity between the two [or three; including Second World countries]. It attempts to unite the problems of feminism that arises in the Third World and Second World countries with the First World feminism. A major issue for transnational feminism is that globalised capitalism would and is damaging Third World and Second World cultures and their beliefs - this is also an effect from US imperialism (cannot discuss what US imperialism is; due to trying to be as concise as possible).

    Feminazi: The pejorative term 'feminazi' is a term coined by the university professor Thomas W. Hazlett, and had been publicly spoken about by the politically conservative talk show radio host, Rush Limbaugh.

    From The Oxford Dictionary of American Political Slang, the term is defined as 'a strong willed woman, or a committed feminist'. But Rush Limbaugh has heavily critiqued the feminist movement and has said that the definition is that of someone who is a 'radical feminist'. The anti-violence educator Jackson Katz has argued that it the word is a "clever term of propaganda". He also goes on to say that it is intended to "bully into complicit silence women who might otherwise challenge men's violence".

    That is why feminism has not strayed off path, but rather; has been propagated with false claims of that women's intentions are not to be considered anymore . . . but rather has gone too far. That, is wrong. Feminism goes strong still to this day, but media outlets have diluted the issues.

    Thanks,
  • ThiefThief 12 Pts
    Hello,

    Before I begin writing an argument for feminism and as to why feminism is, completely about equality. First I will present on how 'feminism' is defined from the Cambridge Dictionary.com¹ website, and then an interpretation from a non-lexicographical perspective - my own.

    Cambridge Dictionary definition for 'feminism': 'The belief that women should be allowed the same rights, power, and opportunities as men and be treated in the same way, or the set of activities intended to achieve this state.'

    Thief's interpretation - redefinition of feminism: Feminism [fēmina²: 'woman', ism: for sense of 'woman's movement'] originated from France in the late 19th century [as feminisme]. The word feminisme was firstly used by French socialist, Charles' Fourier³ as a word to illustrate women into his vision of the emancipation of women in Charles' Fourier's Utopian vision. Three distinguishing historical events must be pointed out. The first-wave feminism, second-wave feminism, and third-wave feminism: though some might argue that we are currently in the fourth-wave feminism.

    The first movement (the term; first-wave feminism was coined by Martha Weinman Lear. She had used it in the New York Times' Magazine and commonly wrote about the second-wave feminism movement) for women's rights was on July 19-20, 1948: New York, Wesleyan Chapel; Seneca Falls - known as the 'first-wave feminism*' - it was commonly known as a legality issue; suffrage rights and property rights. About gender equality, which lasted from the mid-19th century through to the early 20th century . . . specifically 1848-1920 - which in 1920, was when the nineteenth amendment to the United States Constitution was installed - that granted them the right to vote and that was typically known as the end of the first-wave feminism.

    Second-wave feminism** began in the early 1960's (Assumable, though controversial, to suspect that it started in 1963, with the publication from Betty Friedan titled 'The Feminine Mystique' and the President of the United States, John Fitzgerald Kennedy released a report about gender inequality.) [that started in the United States and that spread throughout the western hemisphere] and persisted for 20 more years (ended in the early 1980's) of feminist activity - which focused beyond the scope of just enfranchisement, and rallied towards an increase in equality, ranging from issues such as domestic violence, to official legal inequalities; "equal legal and social rights***". The list of problems are as follows: "sexuality, family, the workplace, reproductive rights, de facto inequalities†". Though thought was emphasised on the issues [are as follows]: domestic violence, marital rape, engendered rape-crisis centres, and women's shelters†† - there were also changes to divorce law and custody law.

    The third wave of feminism, that began in the 1990's through to 2010 [the introduction of the fourth wave of feminism (2010)] (third-wave feminism), is described as being more empowering for women of colour and for the LGBT+§ community than the previous waves of feminism; set to redefine what it meant to be a feminist (first-wave feminism, second-wave feminism), and focuses more on these issues to do with women of colour and the LGBT+ community - individualism and diversity.

    Third-wave feminism was adopted by the feminist punk subculture, riot grrrl [in 1990] in Olympia, Washington. The movement created feminist zines, art and spoke about rape, patriarchy, sexuality and female empowerment. Criticism on the third wave of feminism was that it was too ethnocentric; white feminists were solely focused on suffrage and that it only benefited their own. Other critiques had argued that the idea of belly shirts and pornography was a patriarchal construct and that it was a reversal [of femininity back to the first-wave feminism]; a disguised view of patriarchal beliefs. Contrary to this, third-wave feminists had argued that it was empowering and that it was free self-expression for women; the freedom to choose.

    The controversial fourth-wave feminism occurred in the year 2012 [or], during 2010-2012 - [criticism] some scholars believe that third-wave feminism is still occurring and that fourth-wave feminism does not exist.

    Fourth-wave feminism is described as being interlocked with social stratification for the traditionally marginalised social groups. Fourth-wave feminists advocate that a more equitable opportunity would arise if they incorporated the perspectives of all people, pertaining to policies and practices related to business and politics. Issues like sexual harassment (including street harassment), work discrimination and harassment, body shaming, sexual imagery [usually in the media], online misogyny, campus sexual assault, and assault on public transport are key factors during the fourth wave of feminism.

    Argument presentation: many feminism ideologies exist throughout the world, but three of them will be suffice to articulate and present what I wish to convey on feminism.


    Mainstream feminism (bourgeois feminism): a feminism ideology that derives its place from mid 19th century through to the early 20th century; commonly known as the first wave of feminism, that focused on suffrage for women. Today's meaning of the term is commonly associated with 'branding', 'commercialisation' and an attempt to sell products to so-called feminists - celebrities like Taylor Swift are at the forefront of this feminist movement.

    Radical feminism: radical feminism; or what some might pejoratively consider as, 'feminazi's'. Are a radicalisation; abolition; revolutionary deconstruction of the economic and social systemic structures. Radical feminists believe that the societal and economic systems are a patriarchal devise constituted for the use of oppressors; the privileged - associated with [white] men. Prostitution and pornography are prevalent details in the radicalism feminism.

    Postcolonial feminism. Or, also known as third-world feminism, womanism, Africana womanism, motherism, Stiwanism, negofeminism, chicana feminism, and also femalism: postcolonial feminism is a cause that had been introduced in the 1980's . . . [R]acism and the "long lasting§" political, economic, cultural effects on the non-white, non-western women on the postcolonial era. The argument towards postcolonial feminism is that non-white, non-westerners are being ostracised/left-out of the feminism movement, and that those that are not white are not being respected for the values that they hold - culturally, and are considered as 'other'. Mainstream feminism argues that postcolonial feminism is splitting the movement [towards a better place] for women as a confusing unintelligible ism - movement.

    Whilst postcolonial feminism has revealed and illustrated strong points of concern to the public and has contributed feminism. Scholars have devised a new term that better incorporates the prevalent perils that non-white and non-westerners face: transnational feminism.

    Transnational feminism, or what transnational feminism practitioners and theorists sometimes like to rephrase as: transnational feminisms, transnational feminist praxis, or transnational practices. 'Transnational feminism' [the term] originated from Inderpal Grewal and Caren Kaplan in 1994 in their seminal text 'Scattered Hegemonies: Postmodernity and Transnational Feminist Practices'.

    Transnational feminism removes layers of differences from the postcolonial feminism actions and the disputes that arose from mainstream feminism verses postcolonial feminism. Transnational feminism brings First World and Third World countries together - but differentiates the problems of First and Third World countries; separating and acknowledging - accept[ing] the diversity between the two [or three; including Second World countries]. It attempts to unite the problems of feminism that arises in the Third World and Second World countries with the First World feminism. A major issue for transnational feminism is that globalised capitalism would and is damaging Third World and Second World cultures and their beliefs - this is also an effect from US imperialism (cannot discuss what US imperialism is; due to trying to be as concise as possible).

    Feminazi: The pejorative term 'feminazi' is a term coined by the university professor Thomas W. Hazlett, and had been publicly spoken about by the politically conservative talk show radio host, Rush Limbaugh.

    From The Oxford Dictionary of American Political Slang, the term is defined as 'a strong willed woman, or a committed feminist'. But Rush Limbaugh has heavily critiqued the feminist movement and has said that the definition is that of someone who is a 'radical feminist'. The anti-violence educator Jackson Katz has argued that it the word is a "clever term of propaganda". He also goes on to say that it is intended to "bully into complicit silence women who might otherwise challenge men's violence".

    That is why feminism has not strayed off path, but rather; has been propagated with false claims of that women's intentions are not to be considered anymore . . . but rather has gone too far. That, is wrong. Feminism goes strong still to this day, but media outlets have diluted the issues.

    Thanks,
  • ThiefThief 12 Pts
    Hello,

    Before I begin writing an argument for feminism and as to why feminism is, completely about equality. First I will present on how 'feminism' is defined from the Cambridge Dictionary.com¹ website, and then an interpretation from a non-lexicographical perspective - my own.

    Cambridge Dictionary definition for 'feminism': 'The belief that women should be allowed the same rights, power, and opportunities as men and be treated in the same way, or the set of activities intended to achieve this state.'

    Thief's interpretation - redefinition of feminism: Feminism [fēmina²: 'woman', ism: for sense of 'woman's movement'] originated from France in the late 19th century [as feminisme]. The word feminisme was firstly used by French socialist, Charles' Fourier³ as a word to illustrate women into his vision of the emancipation of women in Charles' Fourier's Utopian vision. Three distinguishing historical events must be pointed out. The first-wave feminism, second-wave feminism, and third-wave feminism: though some might argue that we are currently in the fourth-wave feminism.

    The first movement (the term; first-wave feminism was coined by Martha Weinman Lear. She had used it in the New York Times' Magazine and commonly wrote about the second-wave feminism movement) for women's rights was on July 19-20, 1948: New York, Wesleyan Chapel; Seneca Falls - known as the 'first-wave feminism*' - it was commonly known as a legality issue; suffrage rights and property rights. About gender equality, which lasted from the mid-19th century through to the early 20th century . . . specifically 1848-1920 - which in 1920, was when the nineteenth amendment to the United States Constitution was installed - that granted them the right to vote and that was typically known as the end of the first-wave feminism.

    Second-wave feminism** began in the early 1960's (Assumable, though controversial, to suspect that it started in 1963, with the publication from Betty Friedan titled 'The Feminine Mystique' and the President of the United States, John Fitzgerald Kennedy released a report about gender inequality.) [that started in the United States and that spread throughout the western hemisphere] and persisted for 20 more years (ended in the early 1980's) of feminist activity - which focused beyond the scope of just enfranchisement, and rallied towards an increase in equality, ranging from issues such as domestic violence, to official legal inequalities; "equal legal and social rights***". The list of problems are as follows: "sexuality, family, the workplace, reproductive rights, de facto inequalities†". Though thought was emphasised on the issues [are as follows]: domestic violence, marital rape, engendered rape-crisis centres, and women's shelters†† - there were also changes to divorce law and custody law.

    The third wave of feminism, that began in the 1990's through to 2010 [the introduction of the fourth wave of feminism (2010)] (third-wave feminism), is described as being more empowering for women of colour and for the LGBT+§ community than the previous waves of feminism; set to redefine what it meant to be a feminist (first-wave feminism, second-wave feminism), and focuses more on these issues to do with women of colour and the LGBT+ community - individualism and diversity.

    Third-wave feminism was adopted by the feminist punk subculture, riot grrrl [in 1990] in Olympia, Washington. The movement created feminist zines, art and spoke about rape, patriarchy, sexuality and female empowerment. Criticism on the third wave of feminism was that it was too ethnocentric; white feminists were solely focused on suffrage and that it only benefited their own. Other critiques had argued that the idea of belly shirts and pornography was a patriarchal construct and that it was a reversal [of femininity back to the first-wave feminism]; a disguised view of patriarchal beliefs. Contrary to this, third-wave feminists had argued that it was empowering and that it was free self-expression for women; the freedom to choose.

    The controversial fourth-wave feminism occurred in the year 2012 [or], during 2010-2012 - [criticism] some scholars believe that third-wave feminism is still occurring and that fourth-wave feminism does not exist.

    Fourth-wave feminism is described as being interlocked with social stratification for the traditionally marginalised social groups. Fourth-wave feminists advocate that a more equitable opportunity would arise if they incorporated the perspectives of all people, pertaining to policies and practices related to business and politics. Issues like sexual harassment (including street harassment), work discrimination and harassment, body shaming, sexual imagery [usually in the media], online misogyny, campus sexual assault, and assault on public transport are key factors during the fourth wave of feminism.

    Argument presentation: many feminism ideologies exist throughout the world, but three of them will be suffice to articulate and present what I wish to convey on feminism.


    Mainstream feminism (bourgeois feminism): a feminism ideology that derives its place from mid 19th century through to the early 20th century; commonly known as the first wave of feminism, that focused on suffrage for women. Today's meaning of the term is commonly associated with 'branding', 'commercialisation' and an attempt to sell products to so-called feminists - celebrities like Taylor Swift are at the forefront of this feminist movement.

    Radical feminism: radical feminism; or what some might pejoratively consider as, 'feminazi's'. Are a radicalisation; abolition; revolutionary deconstruction of the economic and social systemic structures. Radical feminists believe that the societal and economic systems are a patriarchal devise constituted for the use of oppressors; the privileged - associated with [white] men. Prostitution and pornography are prevalent details in the radicalism feminism.

    Postcolonial feminism. Or, also known as third-world feminism, womanism, Africana womanism, motherism, Stiwanism, negofeminism, chicana feminism, and also femalism: postcolonial feminism is a cause that had been introduced in the 1980's . . . [R]acism and the "long lasting§" political, economic, cultural effects on the non-white, non-western women on the postcolonial era. The argument towards postcolonial feminism is that non-white, non-westerners are being ostracised/left-out of the feminism movement, and that those that are not white are not being respected for the values that they hold - culturally, and are considered as 'other'. Mainstream feminism argues that postcolonial feminism is splitting the movement [towards a better place] for women as a confusing unintelligible ism - movement.

    Whilst postcolonial feminism has revealed and illustrated strong points of concern to the public and has contributed feminism. Scholars have devised a new term that better incorporates the prevalent perils that non-white and non-westerners face: transnational feminism.

    Transnational feminism, or what transnational feminism practitioners and theorists sometimes like to rephrase as: transnational feminisms, transnational feminist praxis, or transnational practices. 'Transnational feminism' [the term] originated from Inderpal Grewal and Caren Kaplan in 1994 in their seminal text 'Scattered Hegemonies: Postmodernity and Transnational Feminist Practices'.

    Transnational feminism removes layers of differences from the postcolonial feminism actions and the disputes that arose from mainstream feminism verses postcolonial feminism. Transnational feminism brings First World and Third World countries together - but differentiates the problems of First and Third World countries; separating and acknowledging - accept[ing] the diversity between the two [or three; including Second World countries]. It attempts to unite the problems of feminism that arises in the Third World and Second World countries with the First World feminism. A major issue for transnational feminism is that globalised capitalism would and is damaging Third World and Second World cultures and their beliefs - this is also an effect from US imperialism (cannot discuss what US imperialism is; due to trying to be as concise as possible).

    Feminazi: The pejorative term 'feminazi' is a term coined by the university professor Thomas W. Hazlett, and had been publicly spoken about by the politically conservative talk show radio host, Rush Limbaugh.

    From The Oxford Dictionary of American Political Slang, the term is defined as 'a strong willed woman, or a committed feminist'. But Rush Limbaugh has heavily critiqued the feminist movement and has said that the definition is that of someone who is a 'radical feminist'. The anti-violence educator Jackson Katz has argued that it the word is a "clever term of propaganda". He also goes on to say that it is intended to "bully into complicit silence women who might otherwise challenge men's violence".

    That is why feminism has not strayed off path, but rather; has been propagated with false claims of that women's intentions are not to be considered anymore . . . but rather has gone too far. That, is wrong. Feminism goes strong still to this day, but media outlets have diluted the issues.

    Thanks,
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