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The Electoral College: Is It Necessary?

Debate Information

The Electoral College Why We Use It and Why It Matters:

On Election Day, Americans should appreciate the great and long-lasting constitutional tradition bequeathed to them—including the quirky Electoral College system created by the nation’s Founders. The Electoral College remains in place over two centuries after the framers of the Constitution empowered it to select presidents. Though occasionally maligned, this system of electing a chief executive has been incredibly successful for the American people. Many modern voters might be surprised to learn that when they step into a ballot box to select their candidate for president, they actually are casting a vote for fellow Americans called electors. These electors, appointed by the states, are pledged to support the presidential candidate the voters have supported. The Electoral College holds its vote the Monday after the second Wednesday in December following the election.

The Founding Fathers created the Electoral College after much debate and compromise, but it has provided stability to the process of picking presidents. Though the winner of the national popular vote typically takes the presidency, that vote failed to determine the winner in four elections: 1824, 1876, 1888, and 2000.

Some see the Electoral College as a peculiar and mystifying institution that ensures only a few, select individuals will ever cast a direct vote for president in the United States. Others complain that the system rewards smaller states with more proportional power than the large ones.

But what do you think?

  1. Live Poll

    Is the Electoral College fair?

    9 votes
    1. Yes
      55.56%
    2. No
      44.44%
«1



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    Arguments


  • xlJ_dolphin_473xlJ_dolphin_473 1472 Pts   -  
    Argument Topic: Main issue with Electoral College

    The main issue with the electoral college is that some people's votes can end up carrying much more weight than others. For example, someone's vote in Wyoming is worth 3.6 times as much as someone's vote in California. This means that someone can win the election with a minority of votes, as we saw in 2016. Presumably everyone's opinion is of equal value, but the Electoral College overrides this.
    TreeManMrDebatePerson2SkepticalOneOakTownA
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    Argument Topic: Another way to look at it.

    Look at it this way, if it were the popular vote then it would be unfair for the smaller states. Because the smaller states have less population soo they get less votes and the bigger states will win every time.
    TreeMan
  • CYDdhartaCYDdharta 1603 Pts   -   edited June 1
    The main issue with the electoral college is that some people's votes can end up carrying much more weight than others. For example, someone's vote in Wyoming is worth 3.6 times as much as someone's vote in California. This means that someone can win the election with a minority of votes, as we saw in 2016. Presumably everyone's opinion is of equal value, but the Electoral College overrides this.
    No one won a majority of votes in 2016.
    TreeManxlJ_dolphin_473MrDebatePerson2Debater123OakTownA
  • TreeManTreeMan 209 Pts   -  
    Yeah right, now ur saying there was voter fraud in 2016? Clinton won by massive 3 million votes, despite been faced with tons of fake news, and a corrupted FBI director, as well as Russian interference. @CYDdharta
    CYDdhartaMrDebatePerson2xlJ_dolphin_473Debater123OakTownA
  • TreeManTreeMan 209 Pts   -  
    1 person = 1 vote. The current system is incredibly biased to the right, which is why the US is the most conservative western country. The republicans are abusing the system, using far right agendas to influence the smaller states that lack people. @MrDebatePerson2
    CYDdhartaMrDebatePerson2xlJ_dolphin_473PlaffelvohfenDebater123OakTownA
  • CYDdhartaCYDdharta 1603 Pts   -   edited June 1
    TreeMan said:
    Yeah right, now ur saying there was voter fraud in 2016? Clinton won by massive 3 million votes, despite been faced with tons of fake news, and a corrupted FBI director, as well as Russian interference. @CYDdharta
    No, I'm saying Hillary didn't win a majority, and clearly she didn't.  Gary Johnson got over 4 million votes, and that's not counting the 22 other 3rd party candidates.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_party_and_independent_candidates_for_the_2016_United_States_presidential_election
    MrDebatePerson2TreeMan
  • MichaelElpersMichaelElpers 819 Pts   -   edited June 1
    @xlJ_dolphin_473

    Yes and no.  Assuming you did your math correctly on California vs wyoming, smaller states do get more electoral college votes per capita.
    But
    A person's vote in larger states sway the election in a much bigger way.  
    In California your vote has an impact of 55 electoral votes while in Wyoming your vote at most can only add 3 electoral college votes.

    There are many reasons for an electoral college instead of direct vote:

    They include (1) the potential of a few urban states dictating the results, (2) greatly increased incentives to electoral corruption (because bogus or “lost” votes can swing the entire election, not just a single state), (3) the possibility of extended recounts delaying inauguration for months, and (4) various other problems, such as the tendency of such a system to punish states that responsibly enforce voter qualifications (because of their reduced voter totals) while benefiting states that drive unqualified people to the polls.
    TreeManDebater123OakTownA
  • MichaelElpersMichaelElpers 819 Pts   -   edited June 4
    @TreeMan

    Republicans are abusing a system by keeping what the founders of the constitution put in place?

    There is/was good reason not to institute direct democracy see comment above.
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    Argument Topic: Votes matter.

    If it were popular vote than all the smaller states won't have a chance, because they have less population, and so the bigger states matter more. And no one care what the smaller states think because it wouldn't make a difference, the democrats want to take away the electoral college because most of the bigger states are far left and so they get an advantage.
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    Argument Topic: Votes matter.

    If it were popular vote than all the smaller states won't have a chance, because they have less population, and so the bigger states matter more. And no one care what the smaller states think because it wouldn't make a difference, the democrats want to take away the electoral college because most of the bigger states are far left and so they get an advantage.
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    Argument Topic: Reasons popular vote is bad.

    First, A close election would trigger the need for a full recount.
    The cost of a presidential election in the United States is already several billion dollars. On a close popular vote, often defined as a difference of 0.5% or less in the tabulated results, an automatic recount would likely be triggered. That means the cost of counting all the votes would be duplicated. With the polarization in global politics today, especially in the United States, a switch to the popular vote would likely increase costs even further.
    Second, It would limit the influence of local issues in the election.
    When a popular vote is held for a national office, the election becomes more about platform issues than local issues. Resource allocation would be focused on paid advertising, which would negate the need for grassroots activities. That would likely reduce the number of voters who cast a ballot in each election as most people are more concerned about local impacts than national policies. Unexpected emergencies would be difficult to handle. Third, During a popular vote, a candidate who withdraws from the race or dies before the election can be held could still be on the ballot. That offers the possibility that someone unwilling or unable to hold the office could be elected. In U.S. history, there has been one vice-presidential candidate who died after being nominated and one that withdrew from their party’s ticket. Although the 20th Amendment to the Constitution provides clarity to this situation, that process is based on the electoral college. What would happen during a switch to the popular vote would be unknown. Fourth, It would require an Amendment in the U.S. for presidential elections. Since the Constitution and the Bill of Rights became governing documents in the United States, there have only been 17 amendments made to it. The last amendment, the 27th Amendment to the Constitution, was ratified nearly 200 years after it was originally proposed. The amendment requires that any change to the rate of compensation for members of Congress can only take effect after a subsequent election in the House of Representatives. It isn’t impossible to pass a Constitutional amendment, though history shows that it is not an easy process to complete. Fifth, Regional candidates could secure enough votes to win a national election. Imagine a scenario where a presidential candidate focuses on Los Angeles, New York City, Portland, OR and Seattle. That’s a bank of about 14 million potential voters that reliably vote as a majority for Democratic candidates. Using a popular vote system, candidates could campaign regionally, targeting major areas of support, to secure enough votes to win an election. Without any sort of broad support, the politics of the country could become even more fractured than they already are. Those are th problems I see with Popular vote, the Electoral College is fair.


    TrueLove
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    Argument Topic: I know.

    Here is a good reason why you should take me seriously on this subject, I have studied this over and over, my family is very aware with the way government works and things like that. I have studied the Electoral College too, that is why I know so much, and so I ask you to trust me when I say, the Electoral College in good for America.
    TrueLove
  • I'm not sure the Electoral College selects Presidents Exsecutive officer yes, President of a united state, no. 
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    Argument Topic: Again

    Like I said before, The Founding Fathers created the Electoral College after much debate and compromise, but it has provided stability to the process of picking presidents. 
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    Argument Topic: ?

    I am sorry, I don't understand what you are saying. @John_C_87
  • The basic principle is the Electorial college would need to document the person they appoint to the Exsecutive office as a President with the court before elections would be finalized. A President of united state is a basic principle set to be held as a legal precedent set created in America by its claim of independence from English law.
  • SwolliwSwolliw 937 Pts   -  
    Argument Topic: Why a College?

    @MrDebatePerson2
    But what do you think?

    Coming from a country other than the USA I find it incredulous that what goes on in one school can determine the outcome of a Presidential election. Where I come from, voting is compulsory and only those who are over the age of eighteen can vote so that the outcome is not determined by a bunch of wet-behind-the-ears school kids.

    Furthermore, once laws are passed here, they stand. We don't get all those amendments that allow everyone to shoot the bejesus out of each other and commit massacres every second day.

    CYDdhartaTreeMan
  • xlJ_dolphin_473xlJ_dolphin_473 1472 Pts   -  
    Argument Topic: A state is not a person.

    @MrDebatePerson2
    If it were popular vote than all the smaller states won't have a chance...
    Stop thinking of states as people. A person is a person, every person is of equal worth, and every person's opinion should have the same value. As I explained in my earlier post, the Electoral College overrides this.
    MrDebatePerson2PlaffelvohfenCYDdhartaTreeManSkepticalOneOakTownA
  • SwolliwSwolliw 937 Pts   -  
    @xlJ_dolphin_473
    A person is a person, every person is of equal worth, and every person's opinion should have the same value. 

    Well said. If only the recipient of your post would take that on board instead of firing off vitriol and abuse at anyone who dares contradicts his views.

    xlJ_dolphin_473TreeMan
  • MichaelElpersMichaelElpers 819 Pts   -  
    @xlJ_dolphin_473

    Your ignoring the issue that this potentially causes.

    Do you think the 3 branches of government are important or should we just vote directly on all laws?
    Everyone's opinion should have the same value, right?
  • Argument Topic: Rephrased

    I am sorry, I don't understand what you are saying. @John_C_87
    It is a complicated matter so let me first say there is more than one way the vote of the Electoral College can be challenged in a court of law. It need not be made to turn over the results of an election the grievance as an argument in the court can be made to strike down only the crime taking place with the vote that is made with the college. This is to preserve the united states consitution which is series of such united states laws held by legal precedent within the court. It need not be made in a court as the Electoral College can recant its claim that is perjury.

    It appears as though the terms of the contract made to be a President of United State is not quite understood by those who have been permitted to vote. A voter must be able to establish on a legal ground the united state made in law which describes their candidate as a person who sits for all men in a legal constitutional matter, one such as a female President as this is what is described as a common defense to the general welfare. Discrimination takes place when an executive officer is described as a President and is said to represent the commonwealth this is the job description covered by the title of Exsecutive officer not Presdient of a united state. Exsecutive office Biden and Exsecutive officer Trump can be called to testify before a congress or court making them a president of united state speaking on behalf of all men. As they are then placed in a documented position to do so before representation to the United States Consitution.

    The electrical college is not limited to how it can be challenged through the court...Neither are the voters, both former Executive officer Trump or Biden are not Presidents of a united State they are representatives of the same state a woman can be President regardless of the original precedent." All men are created equal by their creator" proving a man in the executive office is, in fact, a President of united state and it is a distinction made between men at power. There are legal differences between a President of united state and a King assigned by church and state.

    All that is taking place here is the same legal united state taking place with same-gender marriage and that is a complicated form of perjury. The common defense for the crime of perjury I have limited in taking part of is Presadera a woman is placed in a constitutional united state creating all women equal by titling her Presadera of a united state of law. The grievance made against women as president is over perjury made by the discrimination accusation being the only legal obstacle to a woman as Presdient or Vice President of a united state.
  • Argument Topic: English Parliament

    The English Parliament would have legally performed the same stragidy by possibly keeping the King of England by use of politics from addressing parliament on the 13 colonies' induction into parliament.
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    @MrDebatePerson2
    If it were popular vote than all the smaller states won't have a chance...
    Stop thinking of states as people. A person is a person, every person is of equal worth, and every person's opinion should have the same value. As I explained in my earlier post, the Electoral College overrides this.

    I am thinking about the people in the states, the smaller states have less population (less people) and the bigger states have a bigger population (more people). More people in the bigger states means the people in the smaller states' votes don't really matter. The electoral college makes it more fair. @xlJ_dolphin_473
    TreeMan
  • CYDdhartaCYDdharta 1603 Pts   -  
    Swolliw said:

    Coming from a country other than the USA I find it incredulous that what goes on in one school can determine the outcome of a Presidential election. Where I come from, voting is compulsory and only those who are over the age of eighteen can vote so that the outcome is not determined by a bunch of wet-behind-the-ears school kids.

    Furthermore, once laws are passed here, they stand. We don't get all those amendments that allow everyone to shoot the bejesus out of each other and commit massacres every second day.

    Wait, what???  You think the Electoral College is a school???
  • SwolliwSwolliw 937 Pts   -  
    @CYDdharta
    Wait, what???  You think the Electoral College is a school???

    The term "Electoral College" contains a word that does give the show away......and it's not the word, "Electoral".

    Regardless, American politics to me looks as though it is run by school kids.......who haven't even passed third grade.

    CYDdhartaMrDebatePerson2TreeMan
  • CYDdhartaCYDdharta 1603 Pts   -  
    Swolliw said:
    @CYDdharta
    Wait, what???  You think the Electoral College is a school???

    The term "Electoral College" contains a word that does give the show away......and it's not the word, "Electoral".

    Regardless, American politics to me looks as though it is run by school kids.......who haven't even passed third grade.

    So which word is it?  (You may want to look up the definition before you answer)
  • SwolliwSwolliw 937 Pts   -  
    @CYDdharta
    So which word is it?  (You may want to look up the definition before you answer)

    Geeziz, you certainly do give the hard questions.

    Okay, now let me think this one out.....................................

    ......................Oh, yes; I think I may be able to work it out through a process of logical elimination; us realists are good at doing that.

    So,ooooooo......if the term "Electoral College" contains a word that does give the show away......and it is not the word "electoral", that would leave one word left which is "college". So that means the word is, "college".

    Am I right, or am I right?

  • CYDdhartaCYDdharta 1603 Pts   -  
    Swolliw said:

    Geeziz, you certainly do give the hard questions.

    Okay, now let me think this one out.....................................

    ......................Oh, yes; I think I may be able to work it out through a process of logical elimination; us realists are good at doing that.

    So,ooooooo......if the term "Electoral College" contains a word that does give the show away......and it is not the word "electoral", that would leave one word left which is "college". So that means the word is, "college".

    Am I right, or am I right?


    Nope, you failed to do your homework.

    college
     noun, often attributive
    col·​lege | \ ˈkä-lij  \


    5    a: a group of persons considered by law to be a unit
          b: a body of electors
    OakTownA
  • SwolliwSwolliw 937 Pts   -   edited June 4
    @CYDdharta
    Nope, you failed to do your homework.

    Wrong. I did my homework thoroughly, you didn't....apart from diverting away from the fact that you got absolutely trumped in that last round. You should know by now that such errant  and blatantly obvious blunders drag out a litany of sarcasm from me. I could have had a field day on that one but I exercised a bit of restraint this time.

    Anyway, I don't know what dictionary you use; no doubt the same as @Maxx I presume....."Thu Yuckedy-doo Book O' Wurds", by Goofy.

    John_C_87
  • Argument Topic: Meriam Webster

    @Swolliw

    Anyway, I don't know what dictionary you use; no doubt the same as ________ I presume.
    ah...#
  • CYDdhartaCYDdharta 1603 Pts   -  
    Swolliw said:

    Wrong. I did my homework thoroughly, you didn't....apart from diverting away from the fact that you got absolutely trumped in that last round. You should know by now that such errant  and blatantly obvious blunders drag out a litany of sarcasm from me. I could have had a field day on that one but I exercised a bit of restraint this time.

    Anyway, I don't know what dictionary you use; no doubt the same as @Maxx I presume....."Thu Yuckedy-doo Book O' Wurds", by Goofy.


    So you're telling us you can't read, or figure out how to click a link.  Pretty sad, really.
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    Argument Topic: Swolliw.

    Listen Swolliw, the Electoral College isn't an actual school! :D and if you don't even know what the electoral college is then you have no reason to debate here. Plus, you don't even live in America, so I don't think you have a place in this debate until you fully understand what is going on here. :D
    Swolliw
  • Argument Topic: In basic principle.

    @MrDebatePerson2
    That principle of not being a school can be argued in open casual debate, It can be more than likely as a private school, and without documentation of the principles, its nominees are a Presdient of United state it is acting without a form of documented legal precedent to protect it from this comparison.

    It may not be conducted as a public school but it does not mean it is not a practice of education.
  • SwolliwSwolliw 937 Pts   -  
    @MrDebatePerson2
    Listen Swolliw

    And listen MrDebatePerson2. You should not keep on making unqualified claims and dictating what other members on this site can and can't do.

    Unqualified claim:  "the Electoral College isn't an actual school"......given that we (should) know what each of the words means, it is fair and reasonable to assume that the Electoral College is some sort of learning institution. Your refusal to qualify your assertion means that my assumption is correct, and it stands.

    if you don't even know what the electoral college is then you have no reason to debate here......is both an unqualified assertion and a vitriolic personal attack as well as dictating to a fellow member his rights to debate.
     Plus, you don't even live in America, so I don't think you have a place in this debate until you fully understand what is going on here.

    You made a non sequitur conclusion based on racial prejudice.

    You may wish to look at your own dismal performance on this site (e.g. sending repetitive spamming messages, condescending remarks and vitriolic personal attacks) to a member for no other reason than you don't agree with their comments. Other members may pass by such unsavory behavior and stick their heads in the sand. I don't, and I will always inform the perpetrator in no uncertain terms. Keep dishing it out and you will hear about it...and not in a kind way either. 

    Offer an intelligent, qualified comment and you will get the same back.

    MrDebatePerson2
  • CYDdhartaCYDdharta 1603 Pts   -  
    Swolliw said:

    given that we (should) know what each of the words means, 

    We knew what the terms meant, you obviously didn't.
  • Argument Topic: Armed service political Intervention on behalf of constitutional preservation..

    You made a non sequitur conclusion based on racial prejudice.
    This is a constitutional statement and may simply just be presumption a racial prejudice. Is the Electoral college necessary may be an inappropriate question to the United state that has been created by segregation of state representation to Presidency? What had taken place in the 12th Amendment may not be part of what was a legal precedent in the original context to the United States consitution. The changes made on ratification to the 12th Amendment can be seen as undermining the basic principle that all men are created equal by their creator.

    In basic principle, the vote of the college decided who was to be Presdient and Vice President of the United States it was to address the political vote as a true race for Executive Office exkeeping a basic principle as truth inside politics that the winner of the election tool first position and the runner up tool second position. Where the original intention may have been to improve work conditions on a political level it exposed the risk of the voting process itself to greater corruption by crime. Not that the corruption need only ever be intentional it by the conditions of nature be by ignorance or accident.

    Here again, the idea of all men are created equal by their creator has been eroded as a constitutional principle and reduced to general prejudice for use in the political arena.
  • MichaelElpersMichaelElpers 819 Pts   -  
    @TreeMan

    Would you like to elaborate on the fallacy here:

    Yes and no.  Assuming you did your math correctly on California vs wyoming, smaller states do get more electoral college votes per capita.
    But
    A person's vote in larger states sway the election in a much bigger way.  
    In California your vote has an impact of 55 electoral votes while in Wyoming your vote at most can only add 3 electoral college votes.

    There are many reasons for an electoral college instead of direct vote:

    They include (1) the potential of a few urban states dictating the results, (2) greatly increased incentives to electoral corruption (because bogus or “lost” votes can swing the entire election, not just a single state), (3) the possibility of extended recounts delaying inauguration for months, and (4) various other problems, such as the tendency of such a system to punish states that responsibly enforce voter qualifications (because of their reduced voter totals) while benefiting states that drive unqualified people to the polls.
  • xlJ_dolphin_473xlJ_dolphin_473 1472 Pts   -  
    Argument Topic: Question for MichaelElpers

    @MichaelElpers
    Do you agree with Vote ID?
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    Vote ID is important, voters should be the right age before they vote, it isn't that difficult
    OakTownA
  • MichaelElpersMichaelElpers 819 Pts   -  
    MrDebatePerson2
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    And with the Electoral College, California has 55 votes, New York has like 21 to 29 votes or something. So the bigger states get lots of Electoral votes as well, even Texas has like 38 electoral votes.
  • xlJ_dolphin_473xlJ_dolphin_473 1472 Pts   -   edited June 5
    Argument Topic: Response to MrDebatePerson2

    @MrDebatePerson2 @MichaelElpers ;
    Unfortunately, VoteID would unfairly discriminate against certain groups of people. 1 in 10 US citizens don’t have valid ID. These people are disproportionately people who don’t have much money, as well as ethnic minorities. Should these people be banned from voting, simply because they don’t have a passport or driving licence? Does this not stand in direct opposition to America’s values of democracy?

    Furthermore, identity theft is very rare at elections, as it can only change one vote at a time, and therefore is a slow, clunky and nigh-on impossible way to steal an election. The issues caused by certain groups of people being turned away from polls are therefore far greater than the risks of election fraud.
    CYDdhartaTreeManOakTownA
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    I would go so far as to say, if you don't like the Electoral College and think it is so not fair, then leave America. We can't just change the Constitution, you need to stop your whining and bellyaching and man up, get over it and move on with your life, except Swolliw, he won't move on.
    TreeMan
  • xlJ_dolphin_473xlJ_dolphin_473 1472 Pts   -   edited June 5
    @MrDebatePerson2
    You can’t change the Constitution? Really? Do tell me more about the value you place on the governmental system of 18th-century American politicians. I find it absurd that America today cannot change a system of government from almost 300 years ago.
    TreeManOakTownA
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  

    Unfortunately, VoteID would unfairly discriminate against certain groups of people. 1 in 10 US citizens don’t have valid ID. 
    You people and your discrimination, well I say this, if a person doesn't have a valid ID that is there fault, and they have no business voting if they don't even have a valid ID. So it isn't discrimination, it is just life, if you want to vote get a valid voter ID, this isn't rocket science.  @xlJ_dolphin_473
    TreeManCYDdhartaOakTownA
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    @MrDebatePerson2
    You can’t change the Constitution? Really? Do tell me more about the value you place on the governmental system of 18th-century American politicians. I find it absurd that America today cannot change a system of government from almost 300 years ago.

    Well first of all, back then government wasn't nearly as corrupt as it is today, and those people, our Founding Fathers were geniuses, there was nothing like the government they made back then, they were also scholars and wise men, and our Constitution is a blessing, it gives us right, opportunities, and freedom, why would you want to take that away?  @xlJ_dolphin_473
    TreeMan
  • MichaelElpersMichaelElpers 819 Pts   -   edited June 5
    @xlJ_dolphin_473

    I think you're getting away from the topic at hand which was on the electoral college.  But I find it very difficult to believe that people can't get a government issued ID, if the ID is required I'm perfectly fine with making it free.
    The minority groups you speak of overwhelmingly agree with voter ID.

    If we don't have things like voter ID to verify identity, address, ect, how do we catch any sort of fraud?

  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    Maybe we are a little off topic, the Democrats don't like voter ID, because most people who don't have voter ID are immigrants, and if the Democrats get rid of voter ID then they are more likely to get more votes, although it doesn't matter, they will just steal votes anyway and commit voter fraud. @MichaelElpers
  • MrDebatePerson2MrDebatePerson2 184 Pts   -  
    GTG, hopefully debate later.
  • @TreeMan

    Would you like to elaborate on the fallacy here:

    Yes and no.  Assuming you did your math correctly on California vs wyoming, smaller states do get more electoral college votes per capita.
    But
    A person's vote in larger states sway the election in a much bigger way.  
    In California your vote has an impact of 55 electoral votes while in Wyoming your vote at most can only add 3 electoral college votes.

    There are many reasons for an electoral college instead of direct vote:

    They include (1) the potential of a few urban states dictating the results, (2) greatly increased incentives to electoral corruption (because bogus or “lost” votes can swing the entire election, not just a single state), (3) the possibility of extended recounts delaying inauguration for months, and (4) various other problems, such as the tendency of such a system to punish states that responsibly enforce voter qualifications (because of their reduced voter totals) while benefiting states that drive unqualified people to the polls.
    There is only one reason for the 12th Amendment on the electrical and it is a violation of a legal precedent the argument is over is the college necessary and it was. Is it now necessary yes though is it, or is it not for the reason of legal precedent to which it was originally constitutional? Originally the Electoral Colledge had the authority to place Pence with Biden and legally negate both Exsecutive officers Trump and Harras or vice versa ( Latin for the other way round).
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