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Is dark side of the moon by Pink Floyd the most iconic classic rock album ever?

Debate Information

Some people do in fact consider dark side of the moon to be the greatest rock album ever made, and based on record sales, it's obviously very iconic. It can also be said that the album cover is easily the most recognizable rock album cover ever.  
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  • Most Iconic Classic Rock Album.
    ????????

    Pink Floyd 
    Welcome To The Machine...

    The Who
    Tommy...

    "Dark Side Of The Moon" is a great album as is "Animals"
    Blastcatpiloteer
  • SonofasonSonofason 367 Pts   -  
    piloteer said:
    Some people do in fact consider dark side of the moon to be the greatest rock album ever made, and based on record sales, it's obviously very iconic. It can also be said that the album cover is easily the most recognizable rock album cover ever.  
    Yes, it's one of the best.
    piloteerPlaffelvohfenBlastcat
  • SwolliwSwolliw 1209 Pts   -   edited October 14
    @piloteer
    I would have to hand the mantle to Led Zeppelin (unnamed) IV.
    This was an album that came out several years before Dark Side and is a showcase of arguably the world's greatest rock band at its best. Stairway to Heaven clearly exemplifies an amalgam of the band's wide-ranging styles and individual talents on one track. There was not a genre that the band never touched throughout its recording history and given that the band already comprised highly accomplished musicians and self-produced, their "secret weapon" was drummer John Bonham. Nowhere but nowhere has there ever been a drummer who could match his technical brilliance and unique style; any professional drummer would have given a right arm to be able to produce such a distinctive, thumping, ear-pounding backbeat. The band's one weakness was that it was very tightly-knit and as soon as Bonham fell off the stool, it was automatic, the band was finished.
    You have to remember also that Led Zep pioneered many things like extended tracks, selling only albums and promoting through the new FM stations which paved the way for bands such as Pink Floyd and all other fledgling rock bands to take their music into mainstream. There were many great rock bands in the seventies but (just like Jimmy Page stood head and shoulders above all studio guitarists in the sixties) Led Zeppelin was the original quintessential rock band who led the others by a long shot.
    piloteerJohn_C_87Blastcat
  • DeeDee 4385 Pts   -  
    Dark side of the moon to me is the perfect album and remains top of the pile when it comes down to it , it’s musical and lyrical perfection 




    piloteerPlaffelvohfenBlastcat
  • Luigi7255Luigi7255 352 Pts   -   edited October 14
    I haven't gotten the chance to hear Dark Side of the Moon, but I can give a substitute.

    Queen: A Night at the Opera

    The mix of fast and upbeat with the slow and sad songs is done perfectly. The music in it itself is amazing, and of course, it's very iconic, winning many awards and being put on many people's "must listen" playlists.
    PlaffelvohfenJohn_C_87BlastcatDee
    "I will never change who I am just because you do not approve."
  • DeeDee 4385 Pts   -  
    @Luigi7255

    Early Queen were brilliant A night at the opera and A day at the races both superb 
    Luigi7255PlaffelvohfenJohn_C_87piloteerBlastcat
  • BlastcatBlastcat 261 Pts   -  
    Argument Topic: This is a rather trivial debate topic

    ______________________

    PREAMBLE TO THE ARGUMENT:

    Hi, piloteer !

    As an old school guy, I know that the album is extremely well played, well produced! The creativity is over the roof. One of the best albums by one of the best classic rock bands of the late 60's and 70's.

    There are lots of really important issues we could be discussing. You chose discussing about musical taste. I get it that some people have had enough of problems and would much rather talk about classic rock albums for a change of pace.

    _________________________

    THE ARGUMENT:

    1. The world has a lot of real problems that people are in disagreement about. In fact, the covid pandemic is showing us that these disagreements can and do cause a huge amount of unnecessary deaths.

    2. Sure, debating classic rock albums is fun. I guess that's the point. But we can use this website to do more than just have fun.. we can use it to learn to think better, and therefore, make better informed decisions. Important decisions. If it turns out that your fav album isn't liked by everyone on the planet, you will not die. If you decide to not take vaccines against covid, you might die, and pass on the virus to more people than if you had taken the vaccines.

    3. Therefore, my dear piloteer, I hope that you will make an effort in the future to come up with way more important topics than this one. If we were all in the MUSIC BUSINESS, then, yours would have been a very important topic. But we aren't are we?

    Enjoy your debates !
    Luigi7255CYDdhartaPlaffelvohfen
  • Luigi7255Luigi7255 352 Pts   -  
    @Blastcat

    Debates don't have to be about the big stuff, you know? They can be about the little things, like, "Which car company is the best?" or "What kind of tea is better: sweet or unsweet?" This website isn't just for debating what's going on in the U.S., since you've said you live in Canada. Sure, we can have U.S.-themed debates, but it doesn't have to be all the time.
    piloteerDeeBlastcatSwolliwPlaffelvohfenJeffreyBlankenship
    "I will never change who I am just because you do not approve."
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -  
    @Blastcat

    Art and culture are fiercely important topics. One really important issue are people who don't realize there's no need to live our lives like tomorrow is the apocalypse.  
    DeeBlastcat
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -   edited October 14
    Luigi7255 said:
    I haven't gotten the chance to hear Dark Side of the Moon, but I can give a substitute.

    Queen: A Night at the Opera

    The mix of fast and upbeat with the slow and sad songs is done perfectly. The music in it itself is amazing, and of course, it's very iconic, winning many awards and being put on many people's "must listen" playlists.
    Dee said:
    @Luigi7255

    Early Queen were brilliant A night at the opera and A day at the races both superb 
    AWESOME ALBUM!!!! I have to agree with @Dee. Queens first three albums, which a night at the opera was among them, they were EPIC. But you really must take some time to listen to dark side of the moon, from start to finish, and the only interruption should be the time it takes for you to turn the album over when the first side is finished, and be sure to immediately listen to the second side.   
    DeeBlastcatLuigi7255
  • DeeDee 4385 Pts   -  
    @piloteer

    I still get the same feeling after many years every time I take the album out and play it  ,an album that becomes even more brilliant with age like the best wines 
    Blastcatpiloteer
  • DeeDee 4385 Pts   -   edited October 14
    @Blastcat

    You’re the sort of individual who if invited to a party celebrating the joys of life would spend the night whining , complaining and finding fault with everything , stop being such a killjoy mate lighten up ……you’re starting to sound like Greta Thunberg …..

    If people die by refusing the vaccine …..great one less nut left to spread lies another reason to be cheerful …..



    Blastcat
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -   edited October 15
    @Swolliw

    Obviously, if we're going to be discussing iconic classic rock and we're not including Led Zepellin, then we must not really be discussing iconic classic rock. And although I believe the Dark side album sleeve is still a more iconic and globally recognized image, it's difficult for me to claim it's somehow more iconic than the zeppelin in flames on Led Zeppelin's first album, or even the symbols that were featured on their 4th album. And they were certainly more economically successful than Pink Floyd, even in lieu of the fact that Pink Floyd had been putting out albums for at least two years before Zeppelin was. And Led Zeppelin most certainly covered more genres than Pink Floyd. Led Zeppelin have cemented their place in rock's iconoclast. If we put all of that together and add the fact that Led Zeppelin was obviously a monster of pioneering band, one may think I should just give up and concede that your ccounter offer is superior to mine, but I'm not going to do that. Instead I'm going to tell you why you're wrong!!!

    Lets start with your claim that Led Zeppelin were pioneers of long duration songs. They were pioneers, but were they really a pioneering band to get longer songs to be a successful cut that gets radio play? If were talking about classic rock iconic pioneers, then that crown goes to Bob Dylan. In 1965 (which is 3 years before Zeppelin formed) Bod Dylan refused to record a shorter radio edit of "like a rolling stone". It was more than a full two minutes longer than what discjockeys considered acceptable. And despite the stubborn and not so well thought out risk that Dylan demanded, the song was a roaring hit. He changed how the rock business was run, and other bands followed suit. 

    If you say Let it be was the last Beatles album, you'd be right that it was their last released album, but Abbey road was the last album the band recorded. Rock enthusiasts often consider Abbey Road to be the most important album that influenced progressive rock, or even the first progressive rock album, but more specifically the second side of the album. And even though there is a track list on that side with separate tracks, the entire side of the album was made as one continuous song with different progressions, beats, modes, and even moods, it was put together as one long song. 1969 was the year of the looonnnnggg song. After Abbey Road, everybody started dedicating an entire side of an album to one loooongg song (Dylan actually did that before any of them also). 

    Genesis, the Allman Brothers and Jethro Tull were a few of the bands that did this, and also Pink Floyd. Atom Heart mother is the name of the album and the title track which took up the entire first side of the album. Led Zeppelin formed in 1968, and their first album was the next year. Their first album did not have any drastically long songs because they were still not successful enough at that time to have been able to produce a long song out of nowhere. Pink Floyd put Atom Heart mother out the same year as Abbey Road came out, which is the same year Zeppelin's first album came out in 1969. Pink Floyd, The Beatles, The Who, Jethro Tull, King Crimson all had made epically giant song before Led Zeppelin had any songs that could be considered long duration. They were not pioneers in that field.

    Your claim that Led Zeppelin paved the way for Pink Floyd is categorically false, especially since Pink Floyd had been releasing successful songs a full two years before Led Zeppelin put out their first album. And to claim specifically that it was Led Zeppelin who paved the way for Album Oriented Radio (AOR) for Pink Floyd is laughable. Sargeant Pepper Lonely Hearts club band (Beatles), and even Pet Sounds (Beachboys) were released before Led Zeppelin were formed, and they were the first truly album oriented rock albums, and Pink Floyd, King Crimson, Yes, The Who and a myriad of others released an AOR album the year Zeppelin released their first album which was emphatically NOT an AOR album. So Zeppelin didn't pave Jack sh!t for Pink Floyd in any regard. 

    Page was a great guitarist, but better than Gilmour, really?!?!?! Page's blues were sloppy. His soloing was very busy. Page played a lot of notes, but Gilmour only played the right ones that needed to be played. Gilmour was far superior in controlling the bends not only over Page, but virtually all other rock guitarists. True rock guitar enthusiasts call David Gilmour the best blues rock guitarist because he sounded more like BB King than any other rock guitarist. He could actually emulate any guitarist. Pink Floyd picked Gilmour up because he was close friends with Syd Barret (Floyd's founding member), and because he was in the best Jimi Hendrix cover band at that time in 1968. I cannot say Gilmour was better than Page at finger picking virtuosic ballads, but Gilmour still made a few great ones like that himself. Page was not superior to Gilmour or the other guitar heroes. 

    Led Zeppelin were a more financially successful band than Pink Floyd, but not one single Zeppelin album ever outsold Dark Side. There's a reason Dark Side of the Moon is always above any Led Zeppelin album in lists of the best selling rock albums. Dark side of the moon remained on the top 200 top selling records for 14 years straight, which is a record that beats every other album by at least twice as long. Led Zeppelin never did that. When we consider which rock album is the most iconic album of the sixties, Sargeant Peppers or Abbey Road are most likely the ones mentioned. Most rock enthusiasts compare Dark side of the moon to those albums, hence why Dark side of the moon is considered "the Sargeant Peppers of the seventies". Dark side of the moon is easily considered the quintessential 70s rock album.

    When we take into consideration the comparison between dark side of the moon and Sargeant Peppers, one thing that they both have in common is that they are concept albums. And even though both albums are very listenable and fun, dark side of the moon makes Sargeant Peppers look corny and over the top. Like a rock album for a Disney movie. Dark side is considered a right of passage from generation to the next because it covered advanced topics like death and hate. It wasn't depressing in any manner, but the observations made in the album were very genuine and sometimes sobering. Money is proclaimed to be "the root of all evil today", but the message was clear that even Karl Marx would not have turned down the chance to get unfathomable wealth. That message is like an anthem for the seventies and eighties. They proclaimed that we are living in a material world long before Madonna did.  

    Pink Floyd was an experimental, avant-garde rock band. They were not making technically skilled music, they were creating emotionally skilled music which, when combined with their musically crafted concepts, they made Zeppelin look like what Led Zeppelin always had been, a corporate rock band. Led Zeppelin were created to consistently pump out commercially successful rock songs. Pink Floyd was created to make universally accepted messages of hope and resistance against oppressive factions. Pink Floyd was created to make Great rock songs, not commercially successful rock songs (but they still managed to be a mammoth of a commercial success). And even though the members of Led Zeppelin were generally more technically skilled than most of the members of Pink Floyd, one thing Floyd had over Zeppelin was being able to write and create a very moving album that was universal for every person. No matter how avant-garde and cutting edge the Floyd were, they were still able to appeal to blue collar working class people. Led Zeppelin could not do that. And Floyd still had Gilmour anyway, so its not like they lacked technical skill. But Roger Waters was a far more skilled lyricist than any member of Led Zeppelin. Led Zeppelin were NOT an experimental rock band.

    Another mode of experimentation Pink Floyd used was technological. Pink Floyd pioneered "noise rock" along with the Velvet Underground (awesome rock band). It was later called "no wave" in the seventies. Another topic that was covered in dark side was imminent fear. On the run was a think piece with no real melody or lyrics, just tense noise. It was a concept that came from Roger Waters horrific fear of flying and being in a band that was constantly needing to fly to make it to their shows. But what stands out is the use of the sequencer on the synthesizer. This changed how synthesizers were used in not only rock music, but most popular genres today. Synthesizers were only considered a novelty, or just a meaner electric piano. Pink Floyd made the synthesizer a profound musical instrument of its own. Kraftwerk, DEVO, Throbbing gristle, suicide, the cars, and Siouxsie and the banshees were just a few of the bands who have since created the philosophical extension of the experiment that was started by Pink Floyd. Those bands represent a myriad of alternative rock sounds that made the 80s. Synth pop and new wave were directly influenced by the Floyd. Zeppelin influenced ACDC :/

    Another thing the Floyd and The velvet underground had in common was the motion illusion light show, and later the theatrical concert experience. That was far more influential to AOR than Led Zeppelin (also, Led Zeppelin were NOT considered the best live rock band, but many consider Pink Floyd one of the greatest live bands, and they earned their talent from many years of constant long duration jams on stage). The Pink Floyd light show is considered the most intensely awesome concert experience. Many other bands like Jefferson Airplane, Parliament Funkadelic, David Bowie, (as well as the "arena rock bands and hair bands") would employ similar rock motion movies and theatrics that were first created by the Pink Floyd in the mid 60s. Tool doesn't have aesthetically cosmic motion movies behind them because Led Zeppelin taught them how to do that, it's because Pink Floyd did.        

     And through the 90s bands like NIN and Alice in chains were directly influenced by the Floyd. And even today, MGMT, Foxygen, Tame Impala and Temples will treat Floyd like the wise gurus of rock. Prince, Parliment Funkadelic, Herbie Hancock, Miles Davis, and bands like tool and System of a Down were heavily influenced by the Floyd. So Zeppelin may have covered more genres, but the bands in all those other genres were not copying Led Zeppelin, they were copying The Floyd. So with all of this evidence in place, I'm gonna have to say no to your counter offer.                 
                 

              



     
         

            

             

      

         
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -   edited October 15
    Dee said:
    @piloteer

    I still get the same feeling after many years every time I take the album out and play it  ,an album that becomes even more brilliant with age like the best wines 
    I never thought of it like that. Dark side does not seem to be able to become irrelevant. And neither does wine
    Dee
  • SwolliwSwolliw 1209 Pts   -   edited October 15
    @piloteer
    Page was a great guitarist, but better than Gilmour, really?!?!?! Page's blues were sloppy. 

    For sure Page was better than Gilmour. You just need to look at Page's body of work alone. As a teenager he was a sought after top session guitarist who was estimated to have played on up to seventy percent of the top ten records in England in the mid-sixties. He played on the Rolling Stones, the Kinks, and the Who because their respective guitarists were not quite up to speed. Meanwhile, what was David Gilmour doing? Bumming around clubs and playing at birthday parties with Paul Simon, hardly what you would call top-shelf stuff. 

    As for style, I reckon Jimmy could play the blues as good, if not better than anyone else. He later included a raw, live version of "You Shook Me" on one of the remasters which really showed the feeling and sheer technical brilliance of his guitar work. Led Zepplin was essentially a blues band and although Gilmour used blues licks (as did everyone), Page lifted many blues standards and completely reworked (some say butchered) into completely different sounding tracks. The Lemon Song was a remake of Killing Floor and through Page's mastery of music he turned choruses into verses, vice versa. And yes, Willy Dixon sued him over Whole Lotta Love but, Geezus.....the sound was so far removed it was only a technical lyrics matter...Led Zep were really paying homage to the guy. Then there were many more, such as Terraplane Blues (Trampled Under Foot) which nobody would have dared try reworking in such a way.

    And what was Gilmore doing?......Up, up, up, up, up and Down, down, down, down, down....great blues that was. I love Gilmores mastery over bending, sustain and, oh those brilliant progressions and notes but, by his own admission, Gilmore has confessed to not being able to play particularly fast so his style really developed as a compensation and that slow, waltzing, floating on clouds sound carried me across the loungeroom many a time. Jimmy could do it all though; he had to nail so many styles in his early days and his trills are still regarded as some of the best in the business.

    In the end, both bands were great and oozed quality but in different ways. The Floyd could sooth and lift you yet Led Zep would slap you in the face (The Ocean) with sudden, daring, bold riffs, then Bonzo would follow through with a sledgehammer relentlessly pounding your entire body with Plant wailing away and Jones just weaving those brilliant bass lines. 

    So I would probably hand both bands the mantle irrespective of individual albums.

    Blastcat
  • SwolliwSwolliw 1209 Pts   -   edited October 15
    @Blastcat @Dee @piloteer @Luigi7255 @John_C_87
    There are lots of really important issues we could be discussing.

    Yes we could. For example I was thinking of debating the reproductive habits of the African Dung Beetle which is a more pressing subject but Geeziz, does it really matter? So long as there is a subject, we can all put our bob's worth in and argue away rather than sitting on the sidelines like a spoilt brat sneering at others who are actually on the field having a go and actually playing.

    Mind you, there is a limit as to what subjects are debate-worthy. An argument over the diameter of Hitler's fundamental orifice would just make it onto the page but a topic on something such as, ooh, let's say, syllogisms for example, wouldn't even make the cut.

    I would rather be put on the sideline through injury (and I have had my fair share) than not to have had a go at all in my own way, for better or for worse.

    DeeLuigi7255Blastcat
  • SonofasonSonofason 367 Pts   -   edited October 15
    Swolliw said:
    @Blastcat @Dee @piloteer @Luigi7255 @John_C_87
    There are lots of really important issues we could be discussing.

    Yes we could. For example I was thinking of debating the reproductive habits of the African Dung Beetle which is a more pressing subject but Geeziz, does it really matter? So long as there is a subject, we can all put our bob's worth in and argue away rather than sitting on the sidelines like a spoilt brat sneering at others who are actually on the field having a go and actually playing.

    Mind you, there is a limit as to what subjects are debate-worthy. An argument over the diameter of Hitler's fundamental orifice would just make it onto the page but a topic on something such as, ooh, let's say, syllogisms for example, wouldn't even make the cut.

    I would rather be put on the sideline through injury (and I have had my fair share) than not to have had a go at all in my own way, for better or for worse.

    It's just a shame that those who are playing on the field never bring their evidence with them.  So many empty words out on the field.  But I did notice someone calling someone a "spoilt brat".  That is very productive in a debate forum.
    Blastcat
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -   edited October 15
    Swolliw said:

    I would rather be put on the sideline through injury (and I have had my fair share) than not to have had a go at all in my own way, for better or for worse.

    Were your injuries from rugby? You outbacks really like your rugby. Crazy sh!t. The only thing I've done that was remotely close was being in a mosh pit at a Pantera show. Ya, don't do that!  
    Blastcat
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -  
    @Swolliw

    I would never take away from the innovation and rawness of Page, but you were right about two things. He lifted EVERYTHING he did from other people, and he was a better guitarist IN THE STUDIO than David Gilmour was. But none of that truly matters when we are trying to discern which of the two bands were more iconic. I wrote you a whole thing with chapters and stuff about the socioeconomic impact of Dark side of the moon, not just which guitarist was better. If it makes things easier, fine, Page was better. But which band was more iconic?         
  • SwolliwSwolliw 1209 Pts   -   edited October 15
    @piloteer
    Were your injuries from rugby? 

    Actually I was brought up in NZ and rugby is religion over there although I was never good at it since I was too skinny and was always put on the wing since I could run well.

    But really, I was having a dig at Grizzlebum (Blastcat) and cryptically informing him that he has a propensity for critisising others rather than participating.

    But which band was more iconic?  

    Led Zep, through Page of course. Although he was a bit of a shoe gazer in the Yardbirds, he did develop into a real showman, the duck walk, cello bow, theremin, double-neck Gibson and the dragon outfit, dripping with sweat. As soon as he (and I suppose, Bob Marley) started using the Les Paul (that Joe Walsh sold him), every lead guitarist played one. Now, that's iconic. As for David Gilmore...he was just content to stand there stony-faced in one spot with his Strat.

    Nobody was such an iconic drummer as Bonzoand you wouldn't exactly call Waters' or Gilmour's voices as iconic as the incredible range and style of Plant's.

    Blastcat
  • DeeDee 4385 Pts   -   edited October 15
    @Sonofason

    It's just a shame that those who are playing on the field never bring their evidence with them. 

    What are you babbling about exactly? Evidence of what exactly do you require? It’s rather amusing  hearing a theist require evidence the one thing they can never supply 


     So many empty words out on the field.  But I did notice someone calling someone a "spoilt brat".  That is very productive in a debate forum.

    Maybe you should join forces with @Blastat get him to include your complaints in his daily list of whines ? No one called anyone a spoilt brat why are you lying?

    but calling  someone like @Blastat a “spoilt brat “ would be a statement of fact he  is on here 2 months and has never stopped whining , flagging and marking every post a fallacy because he cannot debate but in fairness can whine like no other 
    Blastcat
  • SwolliwSwolliw 1209 Pts   -  
    @Sonofason
    But I did notice someone calling someone a "spoilt brat".

    Nobody called anyone a "spoilt brat". Once again, you made it up.

    Blastcat
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -  
    @Swolliw

    The imagery of Led Zeppelin was definitely pretty cool, especially since Pink Floyd purposely did not use flashy costumes like Zeppelin, Bowie and Genesis. So, the Zeppelin movie "the song remains the same" was definitely more visually appealing and more watchable than the Live at Pompeii movie by Pink Floyd. But still, the music was still of a better quality in the Pink Floyd movie than in the Zeppelin movie. If you can ever find the unedited version of echoes on the live at Pompeii movie, I consider it the best song Pink Floyd ever did (even though the album version is kind of mehh in my opinion). The closing sequence of the echoes part 1 is like watching rock and roll surgery and were the resident doctors who get to witness it. It's equally as iconic as Page's split screen juxtaposed with the reverse image with the double guitar on stairway in the song remains the same.            
    Swolliw
  • Argument Topic: Piloteer

    I'm stuck on the word iconic.
    I see the Song "Johnny Be Good"  as an Iconic Rock song and like life, the reason is its seniority as a rock song. Not knowing the album off the top of my head does not mean it is less of an Iconic song. Does the fact a song is on an album also make the album iconic?
    Blastcat
  • Luigi7255Luigi7255 352 Pts   -  
    @Dee

    I love Killer Queen, like, it had a nice mix of electric guitar and piano played at the same time. It was so innovative at the time, same with Bohemian Rhapsody.
    "I will never change who I am just because you do not approve."
  • DeeDee 4385 Pts   -  
    @Luigi7255

    I love Killer Queen, like, it had a nice mix of electric guitar and piano played at the same time. It was so innovative at the time, same with Bohemian Rhapsody.


    So do I works of genius , tracks I never tire of hearing 
    Luigi7255Blastcat
  • Luigi7255Luigi7255 352 Pts   -   edited October 15
    @Dee

    Sometimes, I just like to basically put myself in my own world and listen to Queen to subvert my stress with daily life. The sounds of Queen is honestly akin to the sounds of a calming setting either that or its a tune that'll subvert stress with excitement.
    BlastcatDee
    "I will never change who I am just because you do not approve."
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -  
    John_C_87 said:
    I'm stuck on the word iconic.
    I see the Song "Johnny Be Good"  as an Iconic Rock song and like life, the reason is its seniority as a rock song. Not knowing the album off the top of my head does not mean it is less of an Iconic song. Does the fact a song is on an album also make the album iconic?
    "Iconic" in this case does not mean "seniority", or any kind of authority. It means a globally recognized brand, message, image, or more specifically in this case, an audible recording.     
  • SwolliwSwolliw 1209 Pts   -   edited October 16
    @John_C_87 @Piloteer
    I see the Song "Johnny Be Good"  as an Iconic Rock song 

    I agree with you there. Both Pink Floyd and especially Led Zeppelin, modelled themselves on Chuck Berry and Johnny B. Goode was the epitome of his style. The only thing that prevents me from putting Chuck Berry on a pedestal was his lifestyle and behavior which were not at all very "good". He was a very difficult man to work with, he always demanded payment up front in cash. On stage, his band would constantly change and he would change keys and arrangements without notice. His playing was erratic. There is a famous video of Chuck Berry, Eric Clapton and Keith Richards jamming, or rather trying to jam, Eric and Keith just kept on looking at each other trying to work out what the guy was doing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzKd0aiaK4c

    His personal life was seedy to say the least and he was charged a number of times for abusing and assaulting women, including minors. He had a penchant for hiding video cameras in ladies restrooms and "later, videos Berry recorded of himself urinating on a woman and another of her defecating on him would surface". (Wikapedia) Not a very pleasant man by any means.

    Blastcat
  • @piloteer

    "Iconic" in this case does not mean "seniority", or any kind of authority. It means a globally recognized brand, message, image, or more specifically in this case, an audible recording. 

    There are just some songs that take seniority, and demand authority when just looking at the song and a person. Blueberry Hill for instance.
    Blastcat
  • When just looking at the song "Johnny Be Good."
    Blastcat
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -  
    Swolliw said:
    @John_C_87 @Piloteer
    I see the Song "Johnny Be Good"  as an Iconic Rock song 

    I agree with you there. Both Pink Floyd and especially Led Zeppelin, modelled themselves on Chuck Berry and Johnny B. Goode was the epitome of his style. The only thing that prevents me from putting Chuck Berry on a pedestal was his lifestyle and behavior which were not at all very "good". He was a very difficult man to work with, he always demanded payment up front in cash. On stage, his band would constantly change and he would change keys and arrangements without notice. His playing was erratic. There is a famous video of Chuck Berry, Eric Clapton and Keith Richards jamming, or rather trying to jam, Eric and Keith just kept on looking at each other trying to work out what the guy was doing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzKd0aiaK4c

    His personal life was seedy to say the least and he was charged a number of times for abusing and assaulting women, including minors. He had a penchant for hiding video cameras in ladies restrooms and "later, videos Berry recorded of himself urinating on a woman and another of her defecating on him would surface". (Wikapedia) Not a very pleasant man by any means.

    Perhaps Floyd and Zeppelin were influenced by Chuck Berry, but all the Brittish bands were, to the point of making it an over-generalization.  The name Pink Floyd came from Syd Barrett's love for blues artists Pink Anderson and Floyd Council, hence the name Pink Floyd.  
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -  
    John_C_87 said:
    @piloteer

    "Iconic" in this case does not mean "seniority", or any kind of authority. It means a globally recognized brand, message, image, or more specifically in this case, an audible recording. 

    There are just some songs that take seniority, and demand authority when just looking at the song and a person. Blueberry Hill for instance.
    Songs do not take seniority in any manner other than simply being an older song. Authority, skill, talent, nor popularity are decided based on when a song was released. This thread is not to decipher anything based on musical superiority because ALL of the artists named on this thread are immensely talented musicians. This thread pertains only to which "classic rock" albums are the most universally, and globally recognized, products which consists of the messages, imagery, and popularity of the albums. Each album is considered a product as if the bands were businesses who simply created products for consumers. Which one of these products were the most globally recognized products, and why?           
  • Songs do not take seniority in any manner other than simply being an older song.
    Do you play music as a part of enjoying music?
    Blastcat
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -  
    John_C_87 said:
    Songs do not take seniority in any manner other than simply being an older song.
    Do you play music as a part of enjoying music?
    Yes John, I do. Like I enjoy using my flat screen television and filling my fridge, and posting this message from my apple phone. We are all happy consumers here whose lives are enhanced by all of the these products.    
  • @piloteer

    Songs do not take seniority in any manner other than simply being an older song. Authority, skill, talent, nor popularity are decided based on when a song was released. This thread is not to decipher anything based on musical superiority because ALL of the artists named on this thread are immensely talented musicians. This thread pertains only to which "classic rock" albums are the most universally, and globally recognized, products which consists of the messages, imagery, and popularity of the albums. Each album is considered a product as if the bands were businesses who simply created products for consumers. Which one of these products were the most globally recognized products, and why?  

    Ouch!
    Blastcat
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -  
    John_C_87 said:

     If you have a cut, I wouldn't be surprised if you can find dark side of the moon bandages on Amazon. 
  • @piloteer
    just bruised feelings...
    piloteerBlastcat
  • SonofasonSonofason 367 Pts   -  
    Swolliw said:
    @Sonofason
    But I did notice someone calling someone a "spoilt brat".

    Nobody called anyone a "spoilt brat". Once again, you made it up.

    Swolliw 1196 Pts   -  October 14 edited October 14
    @Blastcat @Dee ;@piloteer ;@Luigi7255 ;@John_C_87
    There are lots of really important issues we could be discussing.
    Yes we could. For example I was thinking of debating the reproductive habits of the African Dung Beetle which is a more pressing subject but Geeziz, does it really matter? So long as there is a subject, we can all put our bob's worth in and argue away rather than sitting on the sidelines like a spoilt brat sneering at others who are actually on the field having a go and actually playing.

    Mind you, there is a limit as to what subjects are debate-worthy. An argument over the diameter of Hitler's fundamental orifice would just make it onto the page but a topic on something such as, ooh, let's say, syllogisms for example, wouldn't even make the cut.

    I would rather be put on the sideline through injury (and I have had my fair share) than not to have had a go at all in my own way, for better or for worse.


    I am never wrong.  And unlike you...I never lie.

    Blastcat
  • SonofasonSonofason 367 Pts   -  
    Swolliw said:
    @Sonofason
    But I did notice someone calling someone a "spoilt brat".

    Nobody called anyone a "spoilt brat". Once again, you made it up.

    Not that I really give a damn, but you did.
    BlastcatDee
  • SwolliwSwolliw 1209 Pts   -   edited October 17
    @Sonofason
    Not that I really give a damn, but you did.

    I didn't and you didn't cite, nor can you cite any proof whatsoever. Yet you give a damn about continually trolling by making up completely baseless malicious claims against other members for no apparent reason at all.

    I don't mind if you keep it up, at least it makes me look good by being stoic while a half-wit jumps around showing his colors.

    Now, explain to everyone in this forum how the following quote can possibly be  interpreted as "Swolliw called someone a spoilt brat". You can't, can you? And neither can anyone else tolerate your deliberate misquotes and malicious interpretations.

     like a spoilt brat 
    BlastcatDee
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -  
    Swolliw said:
    @John_C_87 @Piloteer
    I see the Song "Johnny Be Good"  as an Iconic Rock song 

    I agree with you there. Both Pink Floyd and especially Led Zeppelin, modelled themselves on Chuck Berry and Johnny B. Goode was the epitome of his style. The only thing that prevents me from putting Chuck Berry on a pedestal was his lifestyle and behavior which were not at all very "good". He was a very difficult man to work with, he always demanded payment up front in cash. On stage, his band would constantly change and he would change keys and arrangements without notice. His playing was erratic. There is a famous video of Chuck Berry, Eric Clapton and Keith Richards jamming, or rather trying to jam, Eric and Keith just kept on looking at each other trying to work out what the guy was doing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzKd0aiaK4c

    His personal life was seedy to say the least and he was charged a number of times for abusing and assaulting women, including minors. He had a penchant for hiding video cameras in ladies restrooms and "later, videos Berry recorded of himself urinating on a woman and another of her defecating on him would surface". (Wikapedia) Not a very pleasant man by any means.

    Chuck Berry punched Keith Richards for touching his guitar.   
  • Fats Domino...
    Blueberry Hill...
    Blastcat
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -  
    John_C_87 said:
    Fats Domino...
    Blueberry Hill...
    Geez John, if you're gonna keep going on about the fifties classics, at least pick a decent one. Like poison ivy by the coasters, or the legend of sleepy hollow by the monotones (great Halloween song). Or sea of love by Phil Philips.     
  • Sorry, I misunderstood the direction Iconic "Classic Rock."
    Blastcat
  • maxxmaxx 768 Pts   -  
    well, the beatles white album...@piloteer
    piloteer
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -  
    maxx said:
    well, the beatles white album...@piloteer
    Hands down my favorite Beatles album, but certainly not as iconic as Abbey Road or Sargent Peppers.
  • piloteerpiloteer 1401 Pts   -  
    @Blastcat

    I’m worried we’re going too fast for you to be able to mark all of these posts as fallacies. Shall we slow down for you to catch up?
  • maxxmaxx 768 Pts   -  
    Or maybe Edgar winter@piloteer
  • @piloteer
    I’m worried we’re going too fast for you to be able to mark all of these posts as fallacies. Shall we slow down for you to catch up?
    Worry no more...
    For I am consistently irrelevant.
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