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Best fiction writer?

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My favorite would have to be Kafka, but an honorable mention should go to Capote, Vonnegut, and Dostoyevsky. I wonder how long before the creepy guy from Maine gets mentioned though.        



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  • BarnardotBarnardot 63 Pts   -  
    Well I think all those are the worst nonfiction writers because they weren’t nonfiction writers anyway.@piloteer
  • piloteerpiloteer 1484 Pts   -   edited January 10
    @Barnardot

    Sorry, I meant to say fiction writers. You are correct, that would make my choices all pretty terrible.  
  • maxxmaxx 826 Pts   -  
    alan dean foster and piers anthony are 2 of my faveorites. I used to read stephen king and andrea norton a lot, but not any longer.  @piloteer
    OakTownA
  • SwolliwSwolliw 1328 Pts   -  
    @piloteer
    Great choice of writers there. Vonnegut has to be the standout.
  • piloteerpiloteer 1484 Pts   -  
    Swolliw said:
    @piloteer
    Great choice of writers there. Vonnegut has to be the standout.
    I have a dilemma. None of Vonneguts' books are free on my kindle, so I have to buy his books to read them. If I gotta pay for it, I would prefer it be his best book. Which of his would YOU consider your favorite?  
  • piloteerpiloteer 1484 Pts   -  
    maxx said:
    alan dean foster and piers anthony are 2 of my faveorites. I used to read stephen king and andrea norton a lot, but not any longer.  @piloteer
    Which of their works would you consider your favorite?
  • maxxmaxx 826 Pts   -  
    piers anthony, definitly the xanth series; alan dean foster, the spellsinger series.  @piloteer
  • BoganBogan 41 Pts   -  
    To me, John Grishom is the standout with his courtroom dramas, although lately his numerous books seem to have lost their way.    His best books are his first, A Time To Kill, The Hung Jury, and probably my favorite, The Rainmaker.   If you like crime novels and courtroom dramas, the books of of Michael Connally are extremely good reads.     Private detective story teller Robert Crais's books are very good, his private detective hero is a real larrakin with a devastating sense of humour.   I find his books to be very violent though, with at least one multiple death shootout in every book.    British crime detective novelist Peter Robinson's books can have a certain charm, although I do prefer the flawed character of Inspector Rebus  by Scottish crime writer Ian Rankin. 

    Tom Clancy's earliest books were extremely entertaining, especially The Hunt For Red October, Red Storm Rising, and The Sum of All Fears.       Swedish writer Stieg Larson became a sensation with his three books of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series, before he tragically died young.       The first book is not good, in fact the first 200 pages are quite boring, although the book gets better after that and is OK.         But all of the character envelopment is done in the first book of the series.    The second and third books are all the one story in two books, and they are so good that you can hardly put them down.   

    Wilbur Smith has always done very good books, usually in some way associated with Africa.     

     
  • MayCaesarMayCaesar 4244 Pts   -  
    The best writing I have ever encountered was actually in a video game, not in a book. Planescape: Torment is a true masterpiece of storytelling, it can be approached essentially like an interactive book (as long as you are familiar with the Dungeons & Dragons system and can bear some of the gameplay quirks of the game), and I have never encountered dialogues so provoking as those routinely found in this game.

    As far as books alone go, Patrick Rothfuss' writing completely swept me off my feet and took me away from the real world into pure fantasy and daydreaming for a couple of weeks. I cannot say that his books are particularly deep and full of philosophical ideas - but he understands human psychology extremely well, and in his books good guys often go down dark paths for good reasons, while bad guys turn out to have very relatable motivations. At the same time, he does not descend into cynicism unlike, say, Sapkowski, Huxley or even Rand: as dark as things can be at some points in his books, there is always this optimistic core, this underlying idea that all adversity can be overcome and bright future can be secured.

    An honorable mention goes to Brandon Sanderson and his Mistborn Trilogy. That one has the most contrived plot I have ever seen, one in which seemingly disjointed things eventually all come together. There is not a single scene in his books that you go through and forget about it forever: all the time, after the next scene, you think, "Aha, now I see what that was about!"
    I have no idea how he managed it. If he manually drew a tree of scenes to make a plot out of (as many writers do), his tree must have been humongous.
  • Luigi7255Luigi7255 484 Pts   -  
    I've never really been one for fiction, as I more focus on learning about what's actually around me than a fictional free-for-all. But some of my favorites are only there because I only really read nonfiction and books I have read as a young child are there for nostalgia purposes. I remember always coming home from my third-grade classes, grabbing the old Jeff Kinney book and I would read it for hours. Although this is 7 years later (time flies, huh?) I still remember fondly those memories
    "I will never change who I am just because you do not approve."
  • piloteerpiloteer 1484 Pts   -  
    @Bogan

    Tom Clancy will certainly be remembered as a great political thriller writer for decades, if not centuries to come.  
  • piloteerpiloteer 1484 Pts   -   edited January 10
    @MayCaesar

    Just as much thought and effort goes into modern video game plots as Broadway shows and novels, and of course D&D is an iconic game that has influenced many different genres. 
    MayCaesar
  • BarnardotBarnardot 63 Pts   -  
    Wilbur Smith has always done very good books, usually in some way associated with Africa.     @Bogan

    Is that where you get your education about black people.

  • piloteerpiloteer 1484 Pts   -   edited January 10
    @Luigi7255

    I won't point the finger for only being interested in non-fiction like history and current events, but fiction conveys cultural and social ideas and ideals and helps any reader have a better understanding of the social attitudes that drive modern society. We can learn all the facts about the Roman Empire, but we can never have a full understanding of the cadences and intricacies of their contemporary social culture, because all we know are the facts about their society. We can never know the obscure references used in their language or why they found the things they thought were funny to be funny to them in the first place. We can never know the emotions of their society because we only know the facts about them, but not the feelings and emotions of them as a culture.

     The best we can hope to do as a society is to do what we can to understand those social and cultural cadences and social idiosyncrasies in our own society. Fiction helps keep a modern reader in touch with contemporary culture and the underlying social attitudes of our culture. Even if somebody chooses to resist modern culture, they would still at least need to have a modern understanding of what is not remaining traditional (much to their dismay) for them to know what is not remaining traditional and seethe over. You can't rage against progress if you don't even know society is progressing. Fiction fills the gap that black and white facts cannot fill.        
  • maxxmaxx 826 Pts   -  
    so many genre to choose from.. loius amourwas a very good western writer  @piloteer
    piloteer
  • piloteerpiloteer 1484 Pts   -  
    @maxx

    What do you mean by western writer? Do you mean the plain states of the US, or do you mean not of Asian culture?   
  • BoganBogan 41 Pts   -  
    Bernadot wrote

    Is that where you get your education about black people.

    It has been noted that those who virtue signal about dysfunctional minorities are the ones who live the furthest away from them.
  • maxxmaxx 826 Pts   -  
    louis lamour was a very accomlished writer.  he mainly wrote about the early west in the states; arpound the time of the so called gun fighters @piloteer
    piloteer
  • @piloteer
    Best fiction writer ever the state of Texas...
  • piloteerpiloteer 1484 Pts   -  
    John_C_87 said:
    @piloteer
    Best fiction writer ever the state of Texas...
    Not so much their earlier stuff.
  • It took a while for unconstitutional to catch on.
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